For the sake of the argument

As I have already mentioned here, one reason why I do not often comment on decisions from the Boards of appeal of the EPO on this blog is that any interesting decision that comes out is instantly shot at by all good bloggers around the place before I even get a chance to draw my metaphorical gun.

So, sorry folks, no breaking news from me today, as Laurent Teyssèdre has already been here, as well as others.

But I could not let this one decision T 1914/12 go without a comment or two.

First, because it is highly interesting. Second, because it is in French (so, maybe some non-French speaking colleagues would benefit from further highlights). Third, because I was involved in the case at hand in the first instance proceedings, so this one brings back a number of memories.

The catchword of the decision can be translated as follows:

Boards of appeal do not have any appraisal power with respect to the admissibility of late arguments which are based on facts that are already part of the proceedings (decision diverging from T 1621/09).

A brief presentation of the facts of the case will probably suffice, before summarizing the very thorough legal discussion in the decision.

The patent at stake is entitled “Method of adhesively bonding a strip of flexible fabric to a substrate“. It was opposed after grant and revoked by the opposition division, for lack of inventive step (as well as extension of subject-matter as far as some of the auxiliary requests are concerned).

In the course of the appeal proceedings, the opposition was withdrawn, and the patent was transferred to the previous opponent. Not that this circumstance is really critical.

The key issue is that, for the first time on appeal, the new patent proprietor identified a further distinguishing feature relative to one of the main cited prior art references.

In a written communication, the Board expressed the preliminary opinion that this was a late argument and that its intention was not to admit it into the proceedings. But the Board, for once presided by the legal member, later changed its mind and came to the opposite conclusion. As a result, the first instance decision was set aside, and the case remitted to the first instance for further prosecution.

But before reaching this conclusion, the Board performed a very thorough analysis of the law pertaining to late facts and arguments.

A fancy EPO appeal clock.

The starting point for the discussion is article 13(1) of the Rules of procedure of the Boards of appeal (RPBA), per which:

Any amendment to a party’s case after it has filed its grounds of appeal or reply may be admitted and considered at the Board’s discretion. The discretion shall be exercised in view of inter alia the complexity of the new subject matter submitted, the current state of the proceedings and the need for procedural economy. 

So the question is: does the discretionary power of the Board apply to a situation such as the one at hand, where a new distinguishing feature is identified by the proprietor at a late stage?

As a first step (section 7.1 of the reasons), the Board reviewed in great detail the notions of “facts” and “arguments” and their respective definitions, based on the common understanding of the terms, of the legal understanding of the terms, and on the specific use of the terms in the EPC and case law.

Clearly distinguishing between facts and arguments is not just a matter of hair-splitting. Depending on whether a late submission is viewed as a fact or an argument, the fate of the submission may differ – even in first instance.

As a side note, in one opposition I have handled, a new inventive step attack based on a timely filed document only later identified as a possible closest prior art document was considered by the opposition division as pertaining to a “new fact” and not merely a “new argument” and it was thus not admitted into the proceedings. The Board set aside the first instance decision – but I don’t know yet if this point will be discussed in the reasons or not.

Anyway, the definition offered by the present Board (reasons, 7.1.4) is the following (in my own translation as always):

A “fact” can be understood as a factual (or allegedly factual) element or a circumstance on which a party bases its case, whereas an “argument” designates a proposition that a party bases on one or more facts and which supports the case that it puts forward. 

The Board then gave the example of a lack of novelty attack:

  • The party’s case (“moyen” in French) is that the claimed subject-matter is comprised in the state of the art.
  • One argument is e.g. that the subject-matter is disclosed in paragraph [0017] of D1.
  • Another argument is e.g. that the skilled person understands the paragraph in a certain manner, in view of common general knowledge, and thus views a certain feature as implicitly disclosed.
  • The textual content of the paragraph is a fact.
  • The copy of the document or of its translation is a piece of evidence.

As a next step, the Board addressed the central issue of whether late arguments can be disregarded or not.

Here, the first interesting remark is that the text of the EPC is not the same in the three official languages.

The English version of article 114(1) reads:

In proceedings before it, the European Patent Office shall examine the facts of its own motion; it shall not be restricted in this examination to the facts, evidence and arguments provided by the parties and the relief sought. 

Note the term “arguments” here. But the French version is in fact quite different, as it solely refers to “moyens invoqués” and “demandes présentées“. I would tend to translate the general term “moyens invoqués” by “the party’s case“. The German version does not specifically mention arguments either.

The Board noted that the English version seems to more accurately express the intentions of the drafters of the EPC (is that generally the case? the Frenchman asks), and therefore adhered to this English version in the rest of the reasoning.

Now the key part of the reasoning is that the English version of the second paragraph of article 114, on which the discretionary power of the EPO to disregard late submissions is based, does not refer to arguments:

The European Patent Office may disregard facts or evidence which are not submitted in due time by the parties concerned. 

This is in contrast to the first paragraph mentioned above, which deals with examination of the EPO’s own motion.

Based on the difference between the two paragraphs, the Board concluded that the discretionary power of the EPO is strictly limited to facts and evidence and does not extend to arguments.

Now going back to article 13(1) RBPA, there is a reference here to an “amendment to a party’s case“, which is not very explicit. But the notion of a party’s case is further defined in article 12(2):

The statement of grounds of appeal and the reply shall contain a party’s complete case. They shall set out clearly and concisely the reasons why it is requested that the decision under appeal be reversed, amended or upheld, and should specify expressly all the facts, arguments and evidence relied on. […]

So, on the face of it, it can be surmised that article 13(1) RPBA, via its implicit reference to article 12(2), empowers the Board with the right not to admit a late modification of the arguments of a party on appeal.

But, reviewing the Travaux préparatoires for the current version of the RPBA, the Board found that a proposed article 13(1) containing an explicit reference to arguments was rejected in the drafting process.

Thus, the Board held, the intent seems to have been in fact not to encompass arguments within the purview of article 13(1). See section 7.2.1 of the reasons.

Then, the Board reviewed the relevant case law in detail (section 7.2.2 of the reasons), and found a number of decisions pursuant to which arguments are not subjected to the Boards’ discretionary power.

But then there are T 1069/08 and above all T 1621/09, which decided otherwise. Especially in T 1621/09, an analysis of the travaux préparatoires was performed but the deletion of the word “arguments” in the drafting process of new article 13(1) was not noted.

In the wake of these two decisions, the Board counted 17 later decisions which relied on the principles set out in T 1069/08 and T 1621/09 without questioning them. A couple of recent decisions have however decided the other way around.

As a conclusion, the Board expressed its disagreement with the approach of T 1069/08 and T 1621/09 (section 7.2.3 of the reasons).

The final reason put forward by the Board for such disagreement is that the RPBA should not “lead to a situation which would be incompatible with the spirit and purpose of the Convention” (article 23), which would precisely be the case if article 13(1) RPBA were to be interpreted as encompassing arguments, although article 114(2) EPC, which prevails, does explicitly not refer to arguments, among the late submissions which may be disregarded.

One first question immediately comes to mind: is this question ripe for a referral to the Enlarged board of appeal?

After all, there are a number of diverging decisions, it seems. I guess the answer may depend on whether the Boards which issued T 1069/08 and T 1621/09 will stand their ground or change course.

The second question that I have is: what about the upcoming revised version of the RPBA?

A few months ago, there was a public consultation at the EPO on a draft. I do not know where this project stands right now. But, for what it is worth, there was a new paragraph 2 in article 12 in this proposal, which reads:

In view of the primary object of the appeal proceedings to judicially review the decision under appeal, a party’s appeal case shall be directed to the requests, facts, objections, arguments and evidence on which the decision under appeal was based.

Beside the fact that there is a new concept here (namely “objections“), this provision seems to introduce a limitation to what kind of arguments a party is allowed to file on appeal – namely, those on which the decision under appeal was based.

If one follows the reasoning of T 1914/12, wouldn’t this proposed provision breach article 114 EPC?


CASE REFERENCE: T 1914/12, Board 3.2.05, June 13, 2018, Gaztransport et Technigaz.

Hot numbers

Case law decisions are seldom an easy read. So today’s post will be relaxing, as it deals with some recently published stats. Numbers instead of letters for a change, in the form of the annual report of the Boards of appeal of the EPO, published in the OJ. This yearly publication is a nice source of general information on the activity of the Boards of appeal in the past year.

Here is my selection of subjective highlights from the report. I will focus only on the technical boards of appeal, which handle the vast majority of appeals at the EPO.

First, the total number of new cases, has increased to a record total of 2748. That’s a 15% increase relative to 2015, but only a 6% increase relative to 2012, since there was a drop in new cases in 2013 and 2014.

Second, the total number of settled cases is almost stable at 2229 (down by 3% relative to 2015). However, the number of settled cases after a decision on the merits (i.e. excluding cases in which the appeal was withdrawn, or the statement of grounds of appeal was not filed, etc.) was only 1243, down by 9% relative to 2015.

What I think this all means is that backlog is likely to increase – unless the proportion of withdrawn appeals and the like were to increase for some reason.

This seems to be confirmed by the comparison of the number of pending cases on December 31, 2016, relative to the number of pending cases on December 31, 2015: 8381 vs. 7862. That’s a 6.6% increase.

This also seems to be confirmed by the evolution of the number of cases pending over two years on December 31, 2016, which is 3979 (up by 5% relative to December 31, 2015). The oldest appeals still pending were filed in 2008.

The overall length of proceedings was 2 years and a half, or more precisely 37 months on average (40 months for ex parte appeals and 34 months for inter partes appeals), up by 1 month since 2015.

Hopefully measures will be taken to curtail the increasing backlog. At the very least, the positions in the Boards which are still vacant should be filled soon. In fact, based on the Supplementary publication No. 1 in the 2017 OJ (Information from the Boards of Appeal Presidium, business distribution and texts relating to the proceedings), there are still a number of missing Board of appeal members as of the beginning of 2017.

The most striking example is Board 3.3.02, with no chair and three positions of technical members out of four which are vacant. A helpful footnote indicates that “in view of the vacancy situation in Board 3.3.02, the provisions of Article 3, paragraph 3 will be followed for the composition of the board in particular cases“. Article 3(3) of the Business distribution scheme provides that “if the circumstances of the appeal make it necessary, the Chairman may designate a technically qualified member from another Board. In so doing he shall procure the consent of the Chairman of that Board“. But I am not sure how this can work since there is not even a chairman in this Board.

I would certainly be curious to get some updated information from knowledgeable readers about the vacancy situation – and especially, about what the heck is the matter with Board 3.3.02.

Anyway, back to the 2016 annual report, and let’s now look at the proportion of ex parte and inter partes cases.  Here, the trend seems to be an increase in the proportion of inter partes cases. These cases represent 66% of all new cases in 2016, up by 5.3% since 2014. Inter partes cases are generally more complex than ex parte cases. So this trend will not help reduce the backlog.

In terms of technical fields, appeal cases are traditionally distributed into four groups: mechanics cases (handled by Boards 3.2.01 to 3.2.08), chemistry cases (handled by Boards 3.3.01 to 3.3.10), physics cases (handled by Boards 3.4.01 to 3.4.03) and electricity cases (handled by Boards 3.5.01 to 3.5.05). Of course those are very rough categories.

Since 2014, there has been a marked increase in both the number and proportion of mechanical cases (36.8% of all new cases in 2016), an increase in the number of chemical cases, which only translates into a moderate increase in relative proportion (32.8% of all new cases in 2016), a stability in the number of physical cases (9.4% of all new cases in 2016) and actually a reduction in the number of electrical cases (21% of all new cases in 2016).

It is also quite interesting to look at the proportion of opposition cases relative to the total number of cases, depending on the technical field:

  • Mechanics: 86%.
  • Chemistry: 77%.
  • Physics: 37%.
  • Electricity: 27%.

I assume that the major explanation for this large discrepancy is that the refusal rate is very low in mechanics and chemistry, and that it is higher in physics and electricity, especially because those are the categories in which most computer-implemented inventions are classified. As far as I can tell based on the work my partners Aujain and Patrick do, prosecuting software-related applications at the EPO is an entirely different game from prosecuting other applications. Now, a higher refusal rate probably translates into a higher examination appeal rate.

The outcome of the appeals, further to a decision on the merits, differs depending on the nature of the cases (ex parte or inter partes). The majority of examination appeals are dismissed (54.7% in 2016), but the contrary is true for opposition appeals (only 39.3% in 2016).

In opposition cases, the actual outcome of a successful or partly successful appeal can of course vary greatly. In 4% of cases, the opposition is rejected. In 20.5% of cases, the patent is revoked. In 23.8% of cases, the patent is maintained in amended form, and in 12.4% of cases there is a remittal to first instance.

Has anyone ever had a feeling that getting your appeal in a proper success percentile was a matter of roulette game?

All of this is fine and well, and we are grateful for this report. But there is also a lot that the report does not say. I will take three examples.

First, the report does not address discrepancies from one board to the other in terms of duration of the proceedings.

In the past I sometimes performed a quick and empirical analysis of the length of appeal proceedings in front of a particular board, based on a representative sample of recent decisions, when my client was interested in predicting how long it would take until a final decision for a particular case.

It turns out that the variation from one board to the other is huge, probably from less than 2 years in front of some boards to more than 5 years in front of other boards. This is a major problem which I think would deserve to be better documented – and addressed.

Second, the report does not address board-to-board discrepancies in terms of practice and outcome which, again, I suspect, can be significant.

From time to time, some law firms publish studies focusing on certain aspects.

For instance, JA Kemp recently published a review of software patent decisions in 2016. The review in particular shows a high refusal / revocation rate, which again is to be expected in this specific technical field.

Also, a very informative article by Maarten Nollen can be found in epi Information 1/2015, which focuses on revocation decisions issued in 2014. The article again illustrates interesting differences depending on the technical field at stake.

Third, the annual report does not contain any global evaluation of the outcome of opposition proceedings when taking into account first instance and appeal. Everyone has in mind a rule of thumb of the “three thirds” (i.e. one third of oppositions rejected, one third of patents revoked, and one third of patents maintained in amended form). However, interestingly, the rule may not be accurate when one looks at oppositions under appeal. In the abovementioned article, Maarten Nollen claims that the overall revocation rate for such cases is actually more than 50%.

So, too bad that the annual report is somewhat limited and that no comprehensive statistical analysis of the activities of the Boards of appeal has been made available. On the other hand, this is not completely surprising. Statistics are almost by nature political. Therefore, is it not a natural tendency for all institutions to make a selection of numbers according to their agendas?

Request not found

It is always much more difficult to get what you want from the patent office when you do not know exactly what you want. Or even worse, when the patent office does not know exactly what you want.

Looking at a recent batch of EPO case law decisions issued in French, I came across one example which illustrates this harsh principle. I realized a little bit late that the decision had already been discussed on the Blog européen des brevets, but here it goes anyway.

European patent No. EP 1265983 assigned to the Swiss company Danstar Ferment AG was opposed by Lesaffre International. Back in 2011, the patent was revoked by the opposition division. The patent proprietor appealed, and sadly for all users of the patent system, it is only five years later that the Board of appeal issued its decision, which is… that the appeal was inadmissible! Unfortunate that a case such as this one could not be disposed of earlier.

The reason for the inadmissibility of the appeal was that “the request which defines the object of the appeal is unclear (article 108 EPC in combination with Rules 99(1) and 99(2) EPC) (reasons, 6).

The board summarized the legal framework leading them to this conclusion in section 2 of the reasons for the decision:

According to established case law of the Boards of appeal, the appellant’s case must be presented in a consistent, clear and substantiated manner in the statement of the grounds of appeal, not only in relation with the appellant’s arguments, but also in relation with its requests (see, inter alia, decisions T 760/08 of January 19, 2010, reasons 5, and T 446/00 of July 3, 2003, reasons 2.1.1). Indeed, the purpose of the statement of the grounds of appeal as well as of the notice of appeal is to define the extent of the appeal. This definition is solely and exclusively made by the appellant (see, inter alia decision T 2532/11 of October 14, 2013, reasons 2.5.1). It is important to emphasize that, according to established case law, it is also the parties’ duty to state their requests and decide on the order of these requests (see, inter alia, decision T 148/06 of January 8, 2008, reasons 2). 

Point well taken. So, what happened in this case? First, the notice of appeal itself did not expressly state any request except that the decision under appeal should be set aside. Second, the statement of the grounds of appeal contained a discussion on claim 1 as granted and then on four auxiliary requests (referred to as “propositions of auxiliary requests” at some point in the brief).

The problem is that Danstar’s main request in first instance was not the maintenance of the patent as granted (rejection of the opposition), but rather the maintenance of the patent in an amended form.

The Board stated that it was thus unclear whether the appellant’s intention was to replace the main request filed in first instance with a new main request according to which the opposition should be rejected.

Also, the Board claimed that the so-called “propositions of auxiliary requests” could be meant to replace the previously filed auxiliary requests but could also be additional auxiliary requests.

Therefore, said the Board,

The appellant did not refer one or more clear, precise and converging requests to the Board, which would make it possible to unambiguously define the object of the appeal. 

As a side note, I wonder why the Board mentioned “converging” requests in this sentence. Surely, the converging nature of the requests is only of relevance for the admissibility of the requests themselves, and not for the admissibility of the appeal as a whole. Or is it not?

The Board made reference to some decisions, in particular T 1554/12 and T 1538/09, in which the appeal was held admissible although the appellant’s requests were contradictory or imprecise. The difference between the present case and these earlier ones was, according to the Board, that in the earlier cases the intent of the appellant was clear (despite the imprecise wording), whereas it the present case it was not.

I wanted to see for myself and thus had a look at Danstar’s statement of grounds of appeal. One can only concur with the Board that no main request was set forth in the brief. Since claim 1 of the patent as granted was discussed, it could be argued that the appellant’s intent was to go back to this original version (as opposed to the main request cited in the first instance decision, which is not cited in the brief).

On the other hand, no corresponding set of claims was attached, and the brief was silent on the dependent claims. Therefore, the Board could also have noted that the appellant’s intent with respect to the dependent claims was not clear – although, again, it may be logical to surmise that the dependent claims were also maintained unamended, just like in the auxiliary requests.

Speaking of auxiliary requests, the Board’s view on those may be considered somewhat strict. The four sets of claims were indeed attached to the statement of grounds of appeal, and the unfortunate expression “propositions of auxiliary requests” used at some point in the brief probably did not introduce a fatal ambiguity. Indeed, it was stated at the beginning of the letter: “we attach four auxiliary requests” (not four “propositions“).

In short, it seems relatively clear that the four sets of claims attached to and commented on in the statement of grounds of appeal were those that the appellant intended to rely on in the course of the appeal proceedings.

An interesting question is whether this makes any difference though. Possible answer 1 is: no, if the Board believes that the main request cannot be properly understood, the appeal cannot be decided upon at all, and it has to be held inadmissible. Possible answer 2 is: yes, the Board could disregard an unclear main request and then directly examine the auxiliary requests.

Practically speaking, the appellant did not really fight, which may partly explain the decision. They did not reply to a communication from the Board containing a preliminary opinion which was negative for them both on the admissibility of the appeal as well as on the merits of the case, and both parties renounced their right to oral proceedings.

Anyway, the take home message for us European patent professionals is that we should be crystal clear when we state our requests, and preferably use the keywords that the EPO departments expect from us (“main request“, “auxiliary request No.X“, etc.), as they are not huge fans of guesswork.

There is always a way to know what an appellant's requests are.
There is always a way to know what an appellant’s requests are.

CASE REFERENCE: T 1435/11, Board of Appeal 3.3.08, May 20, 2016, Danstar Ferment AG v. Lesaffre International.

A fishy appeal?

It is not an easy task to report on case law from the EPO Boards of Appeal, as there are so many commentators in the blogosphere (and elsewhere) poised to jump on any fresh decision that being original is tricky, unless you do high frequency posting. Nevertheless, I am wondering whether decisions drafted in French might as a general rule fly a little bit more under the radar, since French is certainly the official language of the EPO which is the least spoken by the European patent profession.

With that in mind, here is a report on one of these low flying decisions, which I find noteworthy for two reasons. The first reason is that the main claim of the patent in suit was directed to a container containing precooked tuna fish, which opens up an ocean of possible aquatic puns for this blogger. And the second reason is that the decision deals with an interesting point of law regarding the burden of proof in appeal proceedings.

The patent owned by Brittany-based Etablissements Paul Paulet had been revoked by an opposition division due to insufficiency of disclosure.

Claim 1 as granted was the following:

A rigid container containing foodstuff, the container comprising a receptacle and a cover and being made of a material selected from aluminum, steel, glass, or a plastics material that is oxygen-proof, the foodstuff being constituted by pre-cooked fish that is in solid form, eventually comprising an additive, a preservative, or a small amount of water or oil, characterized in that

– the closed container presents substantially no liquid after sterilization, such that the liquid content is less than 10% of the total weight of the content, and

– the container contains only the foodstuff and a gas, wherein the volume content of dioxygen in the gas is less than 15%, the gas being nitrogen.

Both features of the characterizing part of the claim were viewed by the opposition division as raising implementation issues.

If we focus on the liquid content feature, the opposition division noted that the patent taught to place the precooked fish into the container, add liquid nitrogen which will be turned into gaseous nitrogen, then close the container and sterilize the product. Based on various statements made by the patent proprietor during the opposition proceedings and information contained in the patent itself, as well as in an experimental report referenced as T4 (filed – unfortunately – by the patent proprietor), it could be concluded that, during the sterilization step, the liquid content in the container can change, and in particular can increase or decrease. Many factors may influence this change in the liquid content, including the type of fish, the precooking procedure, the shape of the fish, the additives and the conditions of sterilization. The opposition division deemed that the patent did not teach how to control these various parameters.

A container for fish hopefully containing more than 10% of liquid
A container for fish hopefully containing more than 10% of liquid

With its statement of grounds of appeal, the patent proprietor filed a modified version of claim 1 as a main request (corresponding to one of the auxiliary requests discussed in first instance). In this modified version of claim 1, the material of the container was somewhat restricted, and the nature of the fish was further specified to be “pre-cooked tuna fish in solid form“.

With the summons to oral proceedings, the Board expressed the preliminary opinion that there was an issue of sufficiency of disclosure with the liquid content feature, although it did not share the view of the opposition division regarding the other feature of the nitrogen / oxygen content.

One month before the oral proceedings, the patent proprietor submitted a new document T18, which was an experimental report focusing on the processing of tuna fish. The admissibility of document T18 at this late stage of the proceedings was debated in front of the Board, in view of R. 13(3) of the Rules of Procedure of the Boards of Appeal.

The patent proprietor’s argument was that:

  • the first instance decision relied on experimental report T4, in which experiments were conducted on billfish product;
  • the main claim was now restricted to tuna fish, so that the first instance decision was no longer applicable;
  • the Board raised a new objection in the preliminary opinion by stating that even with precooked tuna fish the variations in liquid content were unpredictable;
  • therefore the patent proprietor had reacted in a timely manner by filing the new experimental report T18 focusing on tuna fish.

The Board rejected the argument by analyzing the first instance decision, which mentioned a number of ill-controlled parameters influencing the liquid content and not just the type of fish; and by noting that the main request in the appeal was the third auxiliary request in first instance and had thus also been rejected by the opposition division.

The most interesting part of the discussion relates to whether the admission of T18 into the proceedings would violate the opponents / respondents’ right to be heard – in view of the lateness of the filing. The appellant said no, because the respondents had failed to provided detailed justifications and evidence in their response to the statement of grounds of appeal; on the other hand, the appellant did not have to file additional evidence with its statement of grounds of appeal since:

the burden of proof of insufficiency of disclosure lies exclusively with the opponents, in all circumstances. This also applies on appeal further to a decision revoking the patent for insufficiency of disclosure, notably when the grounds of the decision at stake no longer adversely affect the appellant due to a modification of the claimed subject-matter (reasons, 1.4.1).

The Board rejected the argument in view of the very nature of the appeal proceedings.

The respondents brought forward elements during the opposition proceedings which were apparently sufficiently credible as to the impossibility to carry out the invention in a systematic and reproducible manner by relying on the information contained in the patent; moreover, this information would be too limited and contradictory. This led the opposition division to hand down the decision at stake, which was duly reasoned. This decision not only brings an end to the opposition proceedings, but also as a consequence assigns different roles to the parties for the appeal stage. Once the patent has been revoked, it is up to the patent proprietor as the appellant to take a more active part and present, firstly, a detailed argumentation in its statement of grounds of appeal, even if by filing a new set of claims the grounds for the challenged decision seem to be overcome. The appellant cannot simply wait for the respondents to demonstrate the invalidity of the patent.

The patent proprietor, as the appellant, must therefore act against the challenged decision, that is, must, in the present case, demonstrate that common general knowledge does make it possible to carry out the invention based on the patent. This demonstration must be complete and not selective, without waiting for the Board or the parties to invite it to develop it more. In this respect, the appeal proceedings are not a continuation of the opposition proceedings but a new procedure instituted by the appellant. Therefore, the principles which initially governed the opposition proceedings are no longer necessarily applicable at the appeal stage, and those stated in the Rules of Procedure of the Boards of Appeal replace them, notably the duty to provide the complete means in view of which the decision cannot be maintained. A patent proprietor who thinks that they can discard the basis for the challenged decision owing to grounds of appeal limited to only one aspect of said decision runs the risk of later being in a situation where the filing of additional grounds or evidence during the appeal proceedings may be considered late under articles 13(1) and/or 13(3) RPBA (reasons 1.4.2).

I think it is fair to say that the burden of proof of insufficiency of disclosure on the opponents is a very heavy one in opposition proceedings.

However, according to the present decision, the onus shifts on appeal, if the patent is revoked by the opposition division. More generally, it can be derived from the Board’s comments that the first instance decision is presumed valid until the contrary is proven – although I am not sure that this has often been stated in this way in the case law.

On the merits, the Board reached a similar conclusion as the opposition division regarding the unpredictability of the liquid content in the container after sterilization, and therefore dismissed the appeal.

The parties will have the opportunity to continue the discussion and fish for further arguments on the liquid content feature, since there are opposition proceedings pending in connection with the divisional patent, and since the same feature is present in the independent claims. My guess is it will be an uphill battle for the patent proprietor but at least they can hope to be able to rely on the additional evidence that the Board has refused to take into account in this case.


CASE REFERENCE: Board of Appeal 3.2.07, T 30/15, Etablissements Paul Paulet v. Princes Limited & Bolton Alimentari S.P.A, January 20, 2016.