A dented infringement case

It seems that whatever patent-related news breaks in the UK often sets the tone for discussions throughout Europe – it remains to be seen if the Brexit will make any difference.

Take for example the doctrine of equivalents: this topic has become trendy again since the issuance of the Eli Lilly decision of the UK Supreme Court a few months ago. The excitement brought about by the decision is in fact quite understandable as the Supreme Court offered a new test for the appraisal of equivalents.

In France, on the other hand, much less is new under the sun in this respect.

The standard for assessing equivalents has been confirmed many times by the Cour de cassation, and all recent decisions dealing with this issue consistently rely on this standard (see notably here, here and there).

However, a recent ruling by the Paris Cour d’appel seems to have shed a new light on the nuts and bolts of the doctrine. 

French medical company Produits Dentaires Pierre Rolland (PDPR) owns French patent No. FR 2983398 on a “canula and adapter for a multifunction syringe“. In October 2013, PDPR initiated infringement proceedings against Itena Clinical, claiming that the marketing of the canula known as “Aireo Universel” infringed the patent (claims 1 and 6).

In April 2015, the Paris Tribunal de grande instance (TGI) confirmed that claims 1 and 6 of the patent are valid, and found Itena guilty of infringement. Itena appealed, which led to a second ruling issued in June 2017.

The validity part of the first instance judgment was upheld, but the appeal judges overturned the infringement part and found in favor of the defendant.

Here is claim 1 of the patent: 

A canula for a multifunction dental syringe, the canula comprising a fastener bushing that is defined by a circular opening, an end wall, and a side wall comprising a circular cylinder, the canula also including at least two channels enabling fluids to be conveyed separately or together from said end wall to fluid projection orifices, the two channels beginning in said end wall beside each other, the canula being characterized in that the circular cylinder presents a cutout in the thickness of its wall, which cutout comprises, going from the opening: at least one segment extending in a direction other than the axial direction of the cylinder; followed by a longitudinal segment extending towards the end wall.

Am I the only one to be horrified by this dental toy set?

The Cour d’appel first recalled the standard for appraising infringement, taking into account equivalents. As mentioned above, this standard was defined a long time ago:

The scope of the patent extends from the technique which is expressly claimed to any variant combining in the same manner different means performing the same function. The function of a means in an application is defined as the first technical effect achieved by the implementation of this means, making it possible to obtain the result. And two means are equivalent when, although they are of a different form, they perform a same function for a result of a same nature, if not of the same degree.

In this case, the court found that all the features of claim 1 were literally reproduced by the defendant’s “Aireo” product – except one:

The examination of the Aireo product shows that it has a cutout in the internal part of the canula, made of a single longitudinal segment oriented towards the end wall of the canula, which is identical to [what is claimed]. However, the cutout of the Aireo product does not comprise a segment having a direction other than the direction of the axis of the cylinder (transversal segment) [as claimed], so that the cutout is not made of the two segments defined in the characterizing portion of claim 1.

In such a situation, the function of the feature which is not literally reproduced must be established, and then it must be determined whether another feature in the alleged infringement provides the same function or not. 

The relevant discussion in the appeal judgment is the following:

PDPR argues that the collar on the canula, which forms a translation stop, makes it possible to rotate the canula on the adapter up to the longitudinal segment where, subsequently, the lug of the adapter slides in the groove of the Aireo product, which thus generates a longitudinal translation of the canula.

However, the alleged function of mechanical guiding by the collar present on the Aireo product is not of the same quality as that of the PDPR invention. Indeed, in the PDPR invention, when the canula and the adapter are assembled, the lug of the adapter is immediately inserted into the transversal segment of the cutout of the canula where it is mechanically directed into the longitudinal segment of this cutout, whereas such guiding is not ensured with the same efficacy by the collar of the Aireo product due to is planar and smooth surface.

In other terms, according to the claimant, the same function of mechanical guiding was present both in the claim and in the alleged infringement.

But the court did not accept this, since this function was not achieved with the same efficiency in both cases. This is related to the part of the equivalents’ test that reads: “a same function for a result of a same nature, if not of the same degree“. 

So, the court did stick to the classic test, but applied it in a fairly unusual manner. It is not everyday that equivalents are discarded because the common function is partly achieved but not with the same degree of efficacy as in the patent.

Now, for the sake of completeness, there were other reasons for the court not to accept the suggested equivalence: 

Besides, the alleged function of mechanical guiding is admittedly possible but absolutely not necessary, contrary to the device recited in claim 1 of the patent, nor even useful. Indeed, the user of the Aireo product wanting to fix the canula onto the adapter can easily match the lug of the adapter with the groove (longitudinal segment) of the canula, and therefore achieve a translation of the canula owing to its longitudinal segment by simply making a visual (not mechanical) alignment, without needing to resort to a rotative motion involving the planar and smooth surface of the collar, whereas the user of the canula according to the PDPR patent, in order to attach it to the adapter, must necessarily impart a rotation using the transversal segment of the canula, followed by a translation using the longitudinal segment of the canula (mechanical guiding).

So, the function was not necessary nor useful in the defendant’s product. This can probably be translated into: the common function argued by the plaintiff is in fact an artificial one.

Finally, the plaintiff’s case also failed on another prong of the equivalents’ test, which is whether the function could be protected or not in view of the prior art. The court found that the function (in the same context) was in fact known from the prior art, so that the scope of the claim could not validly be extended to the alleged equivalent:

Anyway, infringement by equivalence is not present if the means of the allegedly infringing product are of a different form relative to those which are claimed, and the function performed by these means, identical to that performed by the means of the claimed invention, is known from the prior art.

In this case, the function of mechanical guiding attributed by PDPR to the surface of the collar of the Aireo product combined with the cutout in the internal part of the canula of a longitudinal segment oriented towards the end wall of the canula is known from the prior art. It is notably disclosed in the abovementioned Saurou document (WO 92/04878). […]

Some interesting fine-tuning of the doctrine indeed!


CASE REFERENCE: Cour d’appel de Paris, Pôle 5 chambre 1, June 13, 2017, Itena Clinical v. Produits Dentaires Pierre Rolland, RG No. 15/10544.

Defense ripped to shreds

Today’s case relates to a shredder for plant materials. And while I was browsing online desperately looking for some kind of introductory witticism for this post, I came across a fiction character called the Shredder, to whom a very detailed Wikipedia page is dedicated. It turns out the Shredder is a villain in the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles comics – which I must confess I really do not know anything about.

It is actually fascinating to find out that the Shredder’s webpage is significantly longer than the Wikipedia page on, say, the European Patent Convention. Just to put things into perspective.

So back to what I might indeed attempt to comment on, i.e. a dispute between Société d’Equipements pour l’Environnement (or SEE), owner of a French patent No. FR 2795661 and a European patent No. EP 1066883 (EP’883 claiming the priority of FR’661), and Rabaud, against which the two patents were asserted.

There are at least four different points which are of interest in the judgment handed down by the Cour d’appel de Paris on this case:

  • The invalidation of several claims of FR’661 for insufficiency of disclosure.
  • The finding that Rabaud’s shredder called Xylomix infringes the French part of claim 1 of EP’883 by equivalence.
  • An additional finding of contributory infringement.
  • The rejection of a false marking claim.

Let’s have a look at the invalidity issue first. Claim 1 of the priority patent FR’661 is quite different from claim 1 of the subsequent patent EP’883, which is why this invalidity issue only applies to the former.

Claim 1 of FR’661 concerns a shredder having a shredding rotor, wherein, in particular, “the rotor is suitable for creating an air flow for ejecting matter towards the ejection zone“.

The court noted that the claim does not define how the air flow is created, and that the description of the patent is also silent on this. Specific features seem to be present in the drawings, but without any explanation:

[….] The drawings do not make it possible for the skilled person to understand what the means for creating the air flow in claim 1 is, since the inverted S-shaped line which can be seen on Figures 2 to 4 and the inverted S-shaped double line which can be seen on Figure 6 are not captioned, unlike the other elements making up the rotor, and do not make it possible to interpret claim 1 in such a way that the means is made of ventilation blades. 

[…] In fact, on the other hand, this ventilation means is precisely described in claim 1 of [EP’883], at [paragraphs] [0033] to [0035] of the description, and is captioned in Figures 2 to 4 and 6 (with reference 16) and reproduced in three-dimensional view on Figure 7, which implies that without this description of the means for creating the air flow, the skilled person was not able to implement the invention simply based on common general knowledge. 

A finding of insufficiency of disclosure is not a common thing. And when this finding is in the mechanical field, it is all the more uncommon. Even if the ventilation blades were not mentioned in FR’661, it may not be too difficult for the skilled person to think of such blades as a possible means for generating an air flow. So, was there something specific about the shape or positioning of the ventilation blades which was not obvious to achieve for the skilled person?

The judgment does not tell. But clearly the more detailed explanations in the European patent were held against the French patent. So, drafters had better be careful about leaving claimed functional features unexplained in the description.

See how easy it is to create an air flow?
See how easy it is to create an air flow?

After invalidating claim 1 of the French patent (as well as all other dependent claims asserted by SEE, for the same reason), the court turned to the European patent. Apparently no invalidity defense was raised by Rabaud, which was of course of a great help to the patent proprietor.

Rabaud focused on a non-infringement defense. 

Claim 1 of EP’883 reads as follows (adding the same feature analysis taken up by the court):

a. A shredder, more particularly intended for reducing plants or other materials,

b. comprising a feeding section

c. and an ejection section,

d. between which is arranged a chamber provided with shredding means

e. which consist of a rotor including specific tools depending on the type of plants or materials to be shredded, in alternating positions,

f. i.e.: cutting tools intended for shredding a type of plants,

g. and defibring and bursting tools intended for shredding other types of hard plants or materials,

characterized in that,

h. on the same rotor are also positioned ventilation means, positioned with respect to said cutting tools, so as to define the gauge of the chunks of plants or other materials cut by said cutting tools, allowing the discharge of the shredded plants and other materials out of said chamber,

and in that,

i. in said shredder, said cutting tools, said defibring and bursting tools and said ventilation means are positioned with respect to each other, depending on the direction of the rotor rotation, so as to successively allow the defibring or the bursting operation, the definition of the gauge of the chunks to be cut, the cutting and the discharge of the shredded plants or other materials, 

j. so as to serve as a multipurpose active drum. 

The defendant argued that features h. and i. were not reproduced by the Xylomix apparatus.

Regarding feature i., Rabaud argued that Xylomix’ flails (defibring and bursting tools) do not act on the plant materials before its knives (cutting tools), whereas such a particular order of operation is required by claim 1. But the court was not convinced, especially because they said the order of operation is defined more particularly in a dependent claim 6, so that claim 1 is broader.

The judgment does not specifically address the word “successively” in feature i., which may support Rabaud’s defense. My understanding is that the court interpreted this adverb as simply introducing the various operations, as opposed to requiring a certain order between them. Such interpretation may be debatable. Also, depending claim 6 further specifies driving sections for the flails and knives and does not just add an order of operation to what is recited in claim 1.

As for feature h., the infringement theory was based on equivalence. As a reminder, under French practice and as recalled in the judgment itself:

Two means are held equivalent when, although they are of a different structure, they have the same function for achieving a result of a similar nature or degree. 

In the Xylomix apparatus, the gauge is obtained by way of dedicated metal sheets and not by the ventilation means as required by feature h. Nevertheless, the court acknowledged that the gauge function is achieved in the Xylomix apparatus like in the patent and that the result is of a similar nature. Therefore, there was infringement by equivalence.

One effective defense against the doctrine of equivalence generally consists in arguing that the doctrine does not apply because the claimed function is known from the prior art. But in this case it seems that the defendant did not rely on any prior art at all, which is why the court did not have to examine this particular aspect.

The third interesting point in the judgment relates to contributory infringement. In addition to Xylomix devices having both flails and knives, which were found to be a direct infringement of the patent, Rabaud also marketed “simple” Xylomix devices, with only knives or only flails. Also these simple devices were held to infringe under article L. 613-4 Code de la propriété intellectuelle. Said the court:

[…] The Xylomix shredder brochure intended for Rabaud’s customers, which was seized during the infringement seizure, highlights that it is possible with one rotor to rapidly transition between knives, flails or dual mode, and that the rotor, pictured as “3 in 1” is the only one “capable of addressing all market needs”. 

As rightly noted by the first instance judges, the user who bought a shredder having a “simple” rotor can then buy knives or flails, which are sold separately from the shredder, so as to make it work in a dual mode and thus implement the patented invention without having a right to do so. 

What I think is the most interesting question though is whether all simple rotor sales will be taken into account in the assessment of damages, or only a fraction of those. But this question has been left unanswered so far as the court did not rule on damages, an expertise being ongoing in parallel.

Fourth, and last, false marking. SEE claimed that, in addition to patent infringement, Rabaud was also guilty of unfair competition, due to various mentions in their commercial brochures dating back to 2011. One mention in particular was that Xylomix was “patented“, which was in fact not the case. The first instance judgment sided with SEE on this question, but the Cour d’appel reversed this part of the judgment. The reversal was based on the fact that Rabaud had filed a French patent application in 2009 and then a European patent application in 2010. The French patent was granted in 2014.

The bottom line seems to be that it is OK to put the cart before the horse and refer to a “patented” device when in fact the patent is still pending. Not that I would recommend doing so, though.


CASE REFERENCE: Cour d’appel de Paris, Pôle 5, chambre 1, May 17, 2016, Rabaud v. Société d’Equipements pour l’Environnement, RG No.14/10335.

A toll on Bell

Acts of infringement are broadly defined under French law, and this definition was further expanded in 2014. If we consider direct infringement of a product, article L. 613-3 (a) of the Code de la propriété intellectuelle defines the acts that are prohibited without the consent of the patent proprietor as:

making, offering, putting on the market, using, importing, exporting, transshipping or possessing for these purposes the product which is the subject-matter of the patent.  

Exporting and transshipping are the two terms which were added in 2014. However, the most interesting terms for the purposes of a legal discussion are probably “offering” and “putting on the market“, as they leave quite a bit of room for interpretation, one recent example being an infringement case brought by Eurocopter, later renamed Airbus Helicopters, against the U.S. group Bell Helicopter, based on French patent No. FR 2749561 directed to a landing gear with skids.

In 2012, the Paris Tribunal de Grande Instance (TGI) rejected all infringement claims, as well as all invalidity counterclaims.

In 2015, the Paris Cour d’appel partly reversed, upholding the validity part of the first instance judgment but reaching a different conclusion on infringement. In particular, the appeal judges had a broader view than the first instance judges on what can constitute an offer for sale.

In 2005, Bell Helicopter presented a first version of a helicopter called Bell 429 to the public:

  • by including it in their catalogue;
  • by showing a model in September 2005 in the good town of Toussus le Noble, which was reported on the website of a helicopter enthusiast (Bell argued that this was a confidential presentation);
  • by putting it up on the website of Rotor & Aircraft, their distributor in France.

The Bell 429, first version, incorporated the claimed landing gear, and this does not seem to have been contested by the defendant:

This literal reproduction was admitted when Mr. Robert G., structure manager of Bell Helicopter, was cross-examined during the Canadian proceedings and it is not challenged by Bell Helicopter Textron in the present proceedings. 

But, said Bell, this first version of Bell 429 was a prototype. The TGI agreed, and noted in particular that when this first version was presented in France, it was not yet approved for sale.

But the Cour d’appel took a different view:

Since this was a prototype, only Bell Helicopter Textron can be responsible for the presentation to the public, which they do not deny. They state that the presentation of September 15, 2005 was confidential. But the public was aware of it, since a third party mentioned it. The fact that this website was not updated has no influence on the validity of the offer made at this date, since the prototype was presented on an internet website accessible from France by a company representing Bell Helicopter Textron in France. 

[…]

Offering for sale extends to any material operation aiming at putting a product in contact with potential customers, at preparing a commercial launch, even if said product, which in the present case was not yet approved, could not be marketed. Indeed, this presentation of a competitor’s product in France may turn away part of the competitor’s customers. In fact, this presentation in France was preceded by presentations at the Heli-Expo congress in Houston, USA and at the annual forum of the American Helicopter Society in Montreal, Canada; and it was followed by short-term marketing of the second version apparatus, the approval of this second version having been obtained partly based on tests made on the first version. 

This offer, in these circumstances, is an act of infringement. 

So, even without any sale, and even if no sale is even possible because the product is not yet approved for sale, a presentation of the product to the public in France is an act of infringement if it can be analyzed as part of a preparation for future marketing. This seems to make sense, as it is certainly possible to start attracting customers even before the first product is actually sold.

Bell developed another line of defense based on article L. 613-5 of the Code, which provides a list of exemptions:

The rights conferred by the patent do not extend: 

a) To acts performed in a private context and for non-commercial purposes; 

b) To experimental acts concerning the subject-matter of the patented invention. 

[…]

However, this line of defense was dismissed by the court, since Bell could not prove that any scientific experimentation had been performed. Therefore, the presentation was deemed commercial in nature.

Having dealt with the first version of the Bell 429 helicopter, the court turned to the second version, which appears to have been designed as a workaround of the Airbus patent. The second version was approved for sale in 2009.

The efficacy of the workaround was put to the test in front of the court – and it failed.

The claimed landing gear was in particular characterized by the presence of skids comprising, in the front, a double curvature inclined transition zone, transversely oriented with respect to longitudinal support stretches, and forming an integrated front cross-piece, offset relative to a front delimitation of a plane of contact of the longitudinal support stretches.

Bell’s non-infringement argument was that there was no cross-piece structurally integrated to the landing gear. Instead, there was a cross-piece fixed owing to connecting sleeves. In addition, the gear was longer toward the front, so that there was no offset of the cross-piece relative to the front delimitation of a plane of contact. Finally, the technical advantages offered by the patent were not achieved, as in particular the weight of the landing gear was increased in this second version of Bell 429.

But the court held that there was still a double curvature inclined transition zone in the second version. Although a piece had been added in the front, the claim did not require the cross-piece to be at the front end of the gear, but only required the cross-piece to be offset relative to a front delimitation of the plane of contact, which was still the case. Regarding the structural integration of the cross-piece, the court noted that said cross-piece formed “a functional set” with the skids, so as to transmit mechanical constraints.

According to the court,

This configuration differs from classical landing gears, the cross-pieces of which are fixed with connecting sleeves and do not form a functional set. 

Without having access to the evidence, it is of course difficult to know whether the assessment made by the court is technically correct or not. But what is remarkable anyway is that the fact that the configuration of the infringing device was similar to that of the claimed invention, while at the same time different from conventional devices, appears to have been a key factor.

But the actual test that French courts are supposed to apply relies on a functional analysis, which is why the Cour d’appel also looked at the function of patented features and investigated whether those were (i) reproduced by the Bell 429, second version, and (ii) could be protected per se (irrespective of the claim wording).

According to the patent, deformations are present on the inclined transition zones, that is, as a whole, and not only on the curves. This technical effect is also reproduced on the second version of the landing gear of the Bell 429 apparatus from Bell Helicopter Textron, as indicated by Mr. PPL who states that the deformations are present essentially regularly on the whole transition zone, the zone with the largest level of constraints being where the cross-piece is fixed on the apparatus. 

[…]

The Airbus Helicopters patent covers, contrary to what is stated by Bell Helicopter Textron (namely that the implemented functions were known from the prior art), novel technical functions (front cross-piece with double curvature inclined transition zones, offset, which works in flexion on several planes and in torsion, related to the structure of the apparatus which transmits part of the constraints towards the skids), consisting in addressing the problem of resonance on the ground, by a better adsorption of forces upon landing. 

The documents communicated by Bell Helicopter Textron to demonstrate that the functions performed by the inclined transition zones of the Airbus Helicopters’ patent would be known from prior art landing gears are not relevant as these documents relate to conventional landing gears which do not have an inclined transition zone and work, unlike the invention, in flexion in only one plane, and it was previously stated that this invention is novel and particularly innovative. 

Quite interestingly, the patent proprietor conducted numerical simulations to demonstrate that the second version behaved similarly to the claimed invention in terms of energy adsorption. These numerical simulations were very criticized by the defendant, but the court did find them convincing.

Also, Bell had apparently submitted that the landing gear, second version, behaved similarly to the landing gear, first version, in the approval procedure for the helicopter in Canada.

The overall conclusion was thus the following:

This second version, despite the presence of a connecting sleeve on the first transition zone, and the addition of an element at the front end of the skid, has the same functions for the same result as the invention, and it is irrelevant that this result is not of the same level of sophistication as the invention’s. It should be noted that this modification of the first version was quickly implemented, apparently so as to react to the infringement lawsuit against the Canadian Bell company, a degraded embodiment making it possible to try to conceal the copying. 

In other terms, the second version was found to infringe the patent as well.

For whom the bell tolls.
For whom the bell tolls.

Another noteworthy aspect of the judgment is that statements and evidence from the parallel proceedings in Canada were abundantly referred to, which is not really usual. Very often, judges do take interest in foreign proceedings but they do not directly cite them. However, in this case, they took note of some relevant statements:

Mr. Robert G., manager at Bell Helicopter Textron, who was heard during the Canadian proceedings, acknowledged in front of the court that this modification was determined further to some quick thinking in order to give the second version of the landing gear a behavior identical to the first version. 

So the takeaway message for defendants could well be that a workaround supposed to work in the same way as a claimed invention is at a risk of being found infringing under the doctrine of equivalence. Unless of course the application of this doctrine can be ruled out because the technical functions at stake are already known from the prior art. At the very least, extreme caution is thus required at the time of the design-around.

As for this litigation, this is probably not the end of the story. First, a petition to the Cour de cassation (supreme court) is very likely in a high stake case such as this one. Second, the quantum of damages still needs to be determined. So, unless the parties settle (which is always an option, especially in the context of multinational litigation), we should hear again about Airbus Helicopters and Bell.


CASE REFERENCE: Cour d’appel de Paris, Pôle 5 chambre 2, March 20, 2015, Airbus Helicopters v. Bell Helicopter Textron Inc. et al., RG No. 13/00552.

Cook’in cooked

There is nothing like home-made food. Unfortunately, it seems like kitchens are never roomy enough to accommodate all those nice and fancy appliances for making soups, ice creams, bread, fondue and all that jazz. But as far as courtrooms go, some extra space can always be found for new kitchen appliance lawsuits.

In two previous posts, I discussed a case brought by Vorwerk & Co. Interholding GmbH against various companies responsible for the marketing of food processors of the MyCook brand in France. This case was indeed a good example of how patent infringement damages can be computed in our country.

It turns out that another case was also brought in parallel by the same company, based on the same patent, against other defendants (Guy Demarle Grand Public SAS et al.) responsible for the marketing of another food processor branded as Cook’in. Cook’in was held by the Paris Tribunal de Grande Instance (TGI) as infringing Vorwerk’s patent, just like MyCook – although readers may recall that the appeal judgment on the merits in the MyCook case was set aside by the Cour de Cassation for procedural reasons, so that the Cour d’appel will have to reconsider the issue afresh.

The reasoning adopted by the TGI on the question of infringement in the Cook’in case is very similar to that previously adopted by the TGI and the Cour d’appel in the MyCook case. So, in a way, the recent Cook’in TGI decision is not really surprising; but the decision is a very interesting example of how the doctrine of equivalence is applied in France.

According to well-established case law, two technical means are deemed equivalent if they are of a different form, but perform a same function for a similar result. An additional condition is that the function in question must be protectable.

In this case, claim 1 of the patent reads as follows:

Kitchen machine with a stirrer vessel and a drive for an agitator in the stirrer vessel, wherein the stirrer vessel in its lower region can be heated up, wherein the stirrer vessel is covered by an inserted lid, characterised in that on the inserted lid is arranged a top piece which has a perforated bottom for preparation by steaming of foods, wherein the perforations are formed in a cooking material support of the bottom of the top piece and condensate or moisture formed is conducted back into the stirrer vessel.

This claim was not literally infringed by the Cook’in apparatus for the following reason, according to the court:

The Cook’in machine of the defendants differs from the kitchen machine of the patent in that it does not comprise a lid between the stirrer vessel and the perforated element for steam cooking. This latter element comprises a flange in its lower part on which a seal is arranged, which makes it possible to directly attach it on the stirrer vessel.

The court then made a comparison between how the Cook’in apparatus operates and how the patented machine operates and, applying the traditional test, came to the conclusion that the different technical means that are used did in fact have the same function for a similar result:

[…] Even though the Cook’in machine does not have the insertable lid as taught by claim 1 […], the embossed annular part of the vapor bowl associated with the seal disposed on the periphery provides a means of a [different] form which has the same function, namely ensuring that the cap is above the stirrer vessel, for the same result, i.e. making vapors rise from the stirrer vessel to the upper part of the cap through the dedicated openings and reintroducing the condensates into the stirrer vessel. 

Various arguments were put forward by the defendants in order to show that the Cook’in apparatus did not operate in the same way as the claimed invention, but those were not deemed persuasive by the court.

The defendants also argued that the “inserted lid” feature in claim 1 was an essential feature of the invention which necessarily had to be reproduced in order for the patent to be infringed.

The interesting point about this argument is that this feature of the “inserted lid” was not present in claim 1 as filed and was added during prosecution. So, can the doctrine of equivalence be used at all in this situation? Yes, said the court. The fact that a feature was added during prosecution does not preclude a finding of infringement by equivalence on this very feature:

Vorwerk modified its claim by adding a lid, and the EPO examiner considered that the arrangement of the steam cooking container over the lid was a novel and inventive arrangement. 

Nevertheless, such novelty and inventiveness were acknowledged relative to a prior art where the pierced basket for steam cooking was positioned below the lid. 

Therefore, what was considered as novel and inventive was not so much the presence of the lid, but rather the fact that the steam cooking part was positioned above the stirrer and heating vessel. 

Thus, the scope of claim 1 does not prevent a possible infringement despite the absence of the intermediate lid, if it is established that the means of the Cook’in machine have the same functions for the same result as those of the patent. 

The analysis made by the court here relates to the second part of the equivalence test set forth above, i.e. whether the function of the equivalent means was “protectable“. In the present case, it seems that the function was protectable because the general idea of having a steam cooking recipient arranged above a stirrer vessel was a novel and inventive concept.

There are some devices in which the presence of a lid is absolutly essential.
There are some devices in which the presence of a lid is absolutly essential.

The bottom line of the court’s approach (which is indeed the traditional approach in France) is therefore to assess what the contribution of the invention to the art really is about. A third party’s product implementing the same inventive concept in a different manner will be held infringing, irrespective of the exact claim wording selected by the drafter.

Another interesting point to note about this decision is the computation of damages. Contrary to the parallel Vorwerk v. Taurus litigation, the court (in a different composition) did not appoint an expert but directly proceeded with the assessment of damages. The result of this assessment was similar but not exactly identical to the one made in Vorwerk v. Taurus.

The main point which was discussed was, again, the rate of the indemnifying royalty to be applied. The court was apparently unconvinced by the submissions of either party in this respect and therefore they preferred to rely on the expert’s report from the other case. Although the defendants were different and the infringing device was different, the rationale for determining the proper rate could indeed be applied in a similar manner.

The court noted that three options for the indemnifying royalty rate were offered by the expert, namely 1.5%, 3% and 4.5%. The court explicitly approved the methodology used by the expert, and then came up with its own figure without any clear justification:

In view of the above, in view of the profits made by the defendants, of the advantageous economic situation of [the defendants] due to the marketing of the patented invention without a license, the court can assess the harm suffered without granting the request for additional information, and the indemnifying royalty rate should be fixed to 4%.  

This figure of 4% does not correspond to any of the three options proposed by the expert in Vorwerk v. Taurus, although it is indeed within the expert’s range. But, more importantly, this is not the same figure as the one selected by the court in Vorwerk v. Taurus where a rate of 3% was ultimately chosen by the court! (Again, the composition of the court was different.) Unfortunately, there is no explanation as to why the Cook’in infringement is worth one third more than the MyCook infringement.

At the very least, this inconsistency should be a reminder that courts have a fairly wide discretionary power when it comes to determining the quantum of damages.


CASE REFERENCE: Tribunal de Grande Instance de Paris, 3ème chambre, 4ème section, July 2, 2015, Vorwerk & Co. Interholding GmbH v. SAS Guy Demarle Public et al., RG No. 12/11488.