Where we stand

When it comes to nullity actions in France, there are two topics which have been ultra hot for a few years, and which I think have not yet been addressed on this blog. Maybe precisely because they were too burning hot.

The first topic is standing, and the second one is the statute of limitations. Both are major stumbling blocks on a third party’s way to a preemptive strike.

A recent judgment by the Paris Tribunal de grande instance (TGI) in a pharma case addresses both topics, head-on. Therefore, now seems to be a good time to finally venture into these hazardous waters.

In the case at hand, Actelion Pharmaceuticals filed a nullity suit against the French part of European patent No. EP 1200092 (EP’092) to Icos Corporation (a company of the Eli Lilly group) in June 2015. The patent proprietor challenged the admissibility of the action because they said (1) the claimant did not have standing and (2) the action was time-barred.

So, where do we stand on standing?

Since a famous Barilla case a few years ago, courts seem to have gotten tougher on the appraisal of the standing of nullity claimants, and much ink has been spilled on this topic.

In this context, it is interesting to extensively quote the court’s general remarks on the issue in Actelion, as they are rather complete and enlightening:

[…] The standing to file an action for nullity of a French patent or of the French part of a European patent must be appraised under the requirements of ordinary law and therefore must be personal, legitimate, actual and current on the day the complaint is filed. However, posterior evidence can enlighten the court on the situation at this date or even enable a regularization […]. 

This latter point is interesting. It suggests that even in the absence of standing on the day the complaint is filed, the action may still be admissible if standing can later be acknowledged. By way of example, it is conceivable that the patentee’s behavior after the filing of the complaint may legitimize the lawsuit.

The court’s general guidance then goes on as follows:

The existence of the claimants’ standing must be appraised in view of the object and purpose of the action for nullity of the patent […]. The grant of the patent, whether it is a reward for an investment and a creative effort of the inventor, or for the disclosure of an invention, confers an advantageous monopoly to its owner which is legitimate and admissible in a context of free competition and free innovation only to the extent that its validity requirements are met. A nullity suit thus aims, for a competitor, at retroactively clearing the market of an unjustified obstacle and […] benefits to all when it is filed as a main action and is successful. In this context, the nullity standing must be assessed in concreto and in a flexible manner, in view of the general interest which the action serves: it must be acknowledged for any person who, personally, has an economic activity in the field of the invention which is effectively, or potentially but certainly, impeded by the claims the nullity of which is requested.  

In this respect, the nullity plaintiff must establish the existence of an actual and serious project which may be hampered by the patent, but does not have to establish effective marketing acts, let alone the existence of infringement in advance, claim by claim, by disclosing all of its technical advances;  the advantage conferred by the nullity action […], namely the improvement of the legal situation of the plaintiff, lies in the certainty that they will be able, once their project is set, to engage in costly research necessary for the manufacture and marketing of a product which may compete with the invention, without risking being sued by the patent proprietor and without waiting for this to happen. In particular in the pharmaceutical field, standing borders a prevention interest which is objectively substantiated, as there is no justification for punishing a cautious competitor. 

In other terms a balance has to be struck.

Unlike oppositions at the EPO, a nullity action may not be filed by any person. The claimant must have an actual and objective interest in the patented invention which must be clearly demonstrated, and this is to be appraised on a case by case basis. On the other hand, nullity suits are not exclusively reserved to actual infringers. There must be an incentive for competitors willing to clear their way before actually working the claimed invention or even before spending “costly research” to this end.

At this point, it is probably time to have a look at the patent at stake, which relates to the drug tadalafil, the active substance in the famous drug Cialis for the treatment of erectile dysfunction.

Tadalafil is an inhibitor of an enzyme called phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE-5). It turns out that this active is also useful for the treatment of pulmonary hypertension (PHTN).

Stop killing rhinos! There is no tadalafil in the horn.

The EP’092 patent more specifically claims a particular formulation of the drug tadalafil, in a specific particulate form, as well as a method of manufacture. Claim 12 relates to this drug formulation for use in (any) method of treatment. Claims 13 to 19 are Swiss-type claims directed to the treatment of various sexual dysfunctions.

Actelion is active in the field of the treatment of PHTN, one of the illnesses against which tadalafil is useful – and one which is of course different from sexual dysfunction. The court immediately noted that tadalafil may thus be an interesting molecule for Actelion; and that Actelion and Icos / Eli Lilly are competitors in the treatment of PHTN.

But the court did not limit itself to this basic finding and examined in much more detail the evidence pointing to an actual interest by Actelion in the subject-matter of the patent. 

In this respect, the court found it significant that, in the context of parallel nullity proceedings in the UK, Eli Lilly filed a counterclaim for infringement of the British part of the EP’092 patent. Although this counterclaim does not concern the French territory, the court stated that:

This position implies the existence of a threat which may be carried out in France and above all an objective link between the economic activity of the claimants and the French part of the EP’092 patent.

Then, the court reviewed four different aspects of Actelion’s development activities: 

  • a clinical study conducted in 2012 on the treatment of PHTN by a combination of macitentan with a PDE-5 inhibitor;
  • a clinical study published in 2015, on the treatment of PHTN by a combination of selexipag with a PDE-5 inhibitor;
  • an ongoing multinational clinical trial aiming at comparing a triple combination therapy based on macitentan, tadalafil and selexipag with a double combination therapy based on macitentan and tadalafil, for naive patients recently diagnosed with PHTN; and
  • an ongoing French clinical trial on a double combination therapy based on macitentan and tadalafil, as first-line treatment of PHTN.

The two first studies in the list did not specifically involve tadalafil, but since tadalafil is a particular PDE-5 inhibitor, the court concluded that they were relevant. As for the two last trials in the list, they relied on the use of tadalafil and were therefore directly relevant. Interestingly, these two trials were initiated after the nullity complaint was filed. But the court found that they were nevertheless indicative of R&D work already initiated before that date and could therefore be taken into account for assessing standing.

The next comment by the court probably deserves to be extensively quoted:

Contrary to Actelion’s […] submissions, each of these different elements in isolation is not sufficient to characterize their standing. But their combination demonstrates that the parties are indeed in a situation of competition on the market of the PHTN treatment, and that the latter may rely on the use of tadalafil and pertains to the technical field of the EP’092 patent, which is a second therapeutic use patent not limited to the treatment of sexual dysfunction, and that the combination [of tadalafil] with products which they market is the subject of research authorized in France. To this objective link with the EP’092 patent one must add the actuality and seriousness of the claimants’ plans in France, which do not require a prior commercialization nor a perfect correspondence with the patent’s claims and notably with the specific particle size which is claimed; as well as the threat against them which materialized in the UK.

As a result, Actelion was found to have standing to request the revocation of claims 1 to 12 of the patent. However, regarding claims 13 to 19, the court concluded that there was no standing, as these claims specifically concerned the treatment of sexual dysfunction, and this was not a pathology field covered by Actelion. 

In summary, the court’s position on standing is the following: 

  • standing is appraised in concreto, and a very detailed demonstration by the nullity plaintiff is requested;
  • the plaintiff does not need to demonstrate that they implement or want to implement the various claim features (this is lucky I would say);
  • on the other hand, evidence is required that the plaintiff works in the narrow technical field of the patent at stake;
  • in this respect, one isolated piece of evidence does not seem to be enough, several converging lines of evidence are required.

All in all, the appraisal appears to be extremely strict and it certainly does not encourage preventive nullity suits in any way, although those may be the most rational and effective way to settle a dispute before infringement actually occurs and damages may be incurred.

In a next post, I will try to address the second aspect of the judgment, namely the statute of limitations – the aspect on which Actelion actually lost the case.


CASE REFERENCE: Tribunal de grande instance de Paris, 3ème chambre, 1ère section, March 16, 2017, Actelion Pharmaceuticals Ltd. & Actelion Pharmaceuticals France v. Icos Corporation, RG No. 15/07920. 

The trend extends

Usual readers of this blog will certainly get the impression that the author sometimes repeats himself. And they will be right.

On a number of occasions, I expressed the view that French courts have gotten very strict on added matter (i.e. extension of subject-matter beyond the content of the application as filed) over the past few years. I mean “strict” as in “EPO strict“. And this trend seems to be further confirmed based on two recent decisions by the Paris Cour d’appel.

First of all, in a previous post, I reported on a first instance judgment in Jean Chéreau v. Frappa, in which two European patents were revoked for added matter. One patent fell because of a number of intermediate generalizations. The other one fell because the term “roughly longitudinally movable” was replaced by “longitudinally movable” – which was interpreted as having a fundamentally different technical meaning.

The patent proprietor appealed, but to no avail, as the initial judgment was confirmed on appeal, in a ruling dated February 28, 2017.

Second of all, another patent was revoked by the Paris Cour d’appel on the same ground of nullity on January 24, 2017.

Extension patents are OK but patent extensions are not.

Here are the basic facts of the case. Mr. Damour owns a French patent No. FR 2943699 filed on March 31, 2009, directed to a fire resistant sandwiched panel for doors. An exclusive license was granted to the Compagnie de Fabrication Industrielle de Menuiserie (COFIM).

On July 31, 2012, Mr. Damour and COFIM sued a French woodworking company called Breheret for infringement of the patent. However, in a judgment dated December 4, 2014, the Paris Tribunal de grande instance revoked all claims asserted against the defendant, for lack of inventive step.

The plaintiffs appealed and filed a request for limitation of the patent in parallel, which was granted by the INPI (French patent and trademark office) on July 22, 2015.

The Cour d’appel reviewed the limited claims, and came to the conclusion that they were invalid, but this time due to extension of subject-matter.

Here is a working translation of claim 1, with revision marks relative to claim 1 as granted:

A fire-resistant sandwich panel, [in particular] for the production of doors integrated into fire-block units or facades of fire-resistant technical ducts or for the production of fire hatch covers, said panel consisting of at least one core (1) having a density greater than 400 kg/m3, sandwiched between two wood fiber-based facings (2) having a thickness comprised between 1.5 and 50 mmboth facings being assembled to said core (1) by means of a binder preferably by gluing, characterized in combination

– in that the core (1) extends up to the edge of the panel so that there is no need for the use of bands, and a reliable stability of the fixation means is obtained, 

– in that the core (1) consists of a fiber reinforced silicate material having a density greater than 700 kg/m3,

– and in that said core has a thickness comprised between 6 and 30 mm. 

Ironically, among these various changes, the court focused on the recitation that the core extends up to the edge of the panel and concluded that this represented… an extension of subject-matter.

Here is the relevant part of the ruling:

According to lines 20-24 on page 5 of the patent application as filed, which disclose an example of panel of the invention: “the mechanical features of the core 1 and the facings 2 make it possible to avoid the provision of bands. The core 1, which is made of a hard material, provides strength up to the periphery of the panel, which is sufficient to obtain a good hardness of the edges and a reliable stability of the fixation means (such as hinges, espagnoles, brackets or the like)”. These lines, the drafting of which is ambiguous, must be read in the light of the description of the invention presented from line 14 on page 2 to line 5 on page 3, from which it can be derived that it is the use of the core, the material of which is chosen for its high fire resistance, sandwiched between two wood fiber facings, and not the fact that it extends to the edge taken as such, which makes it possible, on the one hand to obtain a hard edge which is not friable over time, and on the other hand to provide the panel with mechanical resistance qualities which are sufficient to afford a good stability of the fixation elements. 

Claim 1 as limited thus adds a technical effect which extends the scope of the patent in that it indicates that it is the fact that the core extends to the edge which affords a better fixation of the ironwork. 

On page 4, lines 7-9 of the application as filed, it is specified that “the drawing shows that the core 1 extends up to the edge 3, therefore illustrating that the use of bands is unnecessary”. This relates to figure 1 showing an embodiment of the invention, and only makes a connection with the fact that the core extends to the edge and that bands are unnecessary. 

It results from the above that claim 1 as limited must be revoked as extending beyond the content of the patent application as filed.  

To put it otherwise, when looking closely at the application, it seems that the patent proprietor mixed language from two passages of the application. In the first passage it is mentioned that the core extends up to the edge and that the use of bands is unnecessary. In the second passage, it is mentioned that the mechanical features of the core and facings make it possible to avoid the use of bands; and that the core, made of a hard material, provides strength to the periphery and thus a reliable stability of the fixation means.

What neither passage explicitly mentions is that the extension of the core up to the edge results in a reliable stability of the fixation means. This technical effect seems to be rather related to the nature of the core material.

The gold standard applied at the EPO for appraising the allowability of an amendment is whether the amendment can be directly and unambiguously derived from the application as filed as a whole. Here, the court noted that the drafting was “ambiguous“. Therefore, the outcome seems to be in keeping with the doctrine of the Boards of appeal.

It should also come as a warning for patent proprietors who limit their claims in an attempt to overcome first instance revocation grounds. This is a very common strategy, but also one which may sometimes lead them somewhere between Scylla and Charybdis.


CASE REFERENCE: Cour d’appel de Paris, pôle 5 chambre 1, January 24, 2017, COFIM & Vincent Damour v. Breheret, RG No. 15/03652.

The salt of the judgment

When you are in private practice, you sometimes get to work with clients who come up with very creative legal arguments. Or you get to work with clients whose competitors are unfortunately very creative. Rating the chances of success of such creative arguments can be difficult, especially when there is not yet any case law to refer to.

Let us take one example. A patent protects a molecule M1. A competitor markets a drug containing a molecule M2. When this drug is taken up in the body of the patient, molecule M2 is converted to M1. Is this a situation of contributory infringement?

It is not so common for thought-provoking ideas such as this one to be actually tested in court. I was thus quite happy to hear about Shionigi & AstraZeneca v. Biogaran, thanks to Lionel Vial (the decision does not appear on the INPI database). So, if you would like to know the answer to the above question, you may directly go to the end of this post to find out about the guidance offered by the presiding judge of the Paris Tribunal de grande de instance, Marie-Christine Courboulay.

But not so fast, as other aspects of the case are very worth being reviewed.

The patent at stake is EP 0521471 owned by the Japanese pharmaceutical company Shionigi, and licensed to the Swedish group AstraZeneca. The patent covers a drug for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia, called rosuvastatin.

The patent is already relatively old, as it was filed in 1992 and claims a priority of 1991. It went unopposed and expired in 2012. But a Supplementary Protection Certificate (SPC) was granted in 2005 by the French Institut national de la propriété industrielle (INPI), extending the duration of protection until June 29, 2017. And then on top of that, a pediatric extension was granted in 2015, further extending the duration of protection till December 29, 2017.

The SPC was granted for the product simply identified as “rosuvastatin”, based on a Dutch Marketing Authorization (MA) for the drug Crestor, which contains a calcium salt of rosuvastatin.

Biogaran developed a generic version of rosuvastatin. In 2014, Biogaran warned AstraZeneca and Shionigi that they had applied for an MA for the zinc salt of rosuvastatin, and stated that this product did not infringe the SPC. AstraZeneca and Shionigi did not agree with the latter statement.

Two years later, Biogaran obtained its MA and announced that it intended to launch the generic drug in July 2016 – i.e. before the term of the extended SPC.

As a result, AstraZeneca and Shionigi filed a motion for preliminary injunction (PI) in front of the judge in charge of urgency proceedings (juge des référés) on April 26, 2016. The judge issued her order on July 4, 2016.

The criteria assessed by the juge des référés for deciding on the PI are whether infringement is likely, and whether there is any serious validity challenge.

In the present case, Ms. Courboulay deemed that there is no serious validity challenge; but that, on the other hand, infringement is not likely.

As a preliminary step in the reasoning, the claims of the patent were interpreted in view of the description. It is certainly a very good thing when a patent is construed as a first step, and thus in a consistent way for both validity and infringement.

In the present case, this preliminary interpretation step led to a result which may come as a shock to a number of foreign patent attorneys but which seems to be in keeping with the tradition of French patent law.

Claim 1 of the EP’471 patent reads as follows:

The compound (+)-7-[ 4-(4-fluorophenyl)-6-isopropyl-2-(N-methyl-N-methylsulfonylamino)pyrimidin-5-yl)-(3R,5S)dihydroxy-(E)-6-heptenoic acid or a non-toxic pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof.

This is the full name of rosuvastatin, either in the form of an acid or of a salt – any possible salt, it would seem.

Dependent claims 2, 3 and 4 respectively and specifically relate to the acid form, to the calcium salt and to the sodium salt of rosuvastatin.

The judge referred to article 69 EPC and the interpretative protocol, and made the following comments as to which rosuvastatin salts are protected by the patent:

[The patent] is drafted as disclosing a new pharmaceutical active substance, rosuvastatin, and the pharmaceutically acceptable salts of this substance, and the cited examples are only indicative and do not limit the protection to the only cited examples. However, the description and notably paragraph 007 provides examples of pharmaceutically acceptable non-toxic salts of rosuvastatin and makes reference to two families of metallic ions which were commonly used in the formulation of tablets of statins already known at the priority date, and in particular alcaline metal ions and alcaline earth metal ions. […] Thus, the pharmaceutically acceptable non-toxic salts are in these two families […], as the patent does not give any indication to the skilled person to select a salt in another family. On the contrary, the description focuses on these salts because they were already commonly used for the formulation of statin tablets; it does not provide any other lead, so that the skilled person will select a salt in the families offered by the patent as being the only relevant families for statins. He/she will not try to select salts of other families as the patent does not teach anything in this respect. 

Therefore, only salts belonging to the cited families, namely alcaline metals like sodium or alcaline earth metals like calcium, or those which can be part of the most commonly used cations for the formulation of statin tablets are concerned by the patent. The other salt families are not mentioned and thus excluded from the scope of protection of the patent

In summary, claim 1, taken at face value, covers any pharmaceutically acceptable salts of rosuvastatin. But according to the judge, the actual scope of the patent is narrower, as only two families of salts are covered: alcaline metal salts (such as sodium) and alcaline earth metal salts (such as calcium).

So beware: the interpretation of the claims in view of the description can result not only in a broadening of the scope of protection relative to the literal wording of the claims, but also in a restriction of the scope.

Just to be clear, this finding does not seem to be related to the existence of an SPC. The (re)definition of the scope of the patent was made with respect to the patent, not the SPC. See in particular the following comment in the judgment:

Although the Crestor MA designates the calcium salt of rosuvastatin, the scope of the […] SPC extends to all forms of rosuvastatin as covered by the EP’471 patent.

A judgment to be taken with a grain of salt?

Again, the limitation of the patent devised by the judge may come as a surprise from a European perspective. But I think it is in keeping with traditional French practice. French judges have consistently had a large degree of discretion in defining the scope of protection based on the overall teaching of the patent – or spirit of the invention.

Maybe another way to look at this would be to consider that the invention was sufficiently disclosed in the patent only for the two salt families explicitly mentioned (and exemplified) in the patent, which, as far as I understand, were the two usual salt families for other similar drugs at the priority date. Using other salts would have required further research.

Anyway, the consequence of this interpretation of the claim is that there was no direct infringement of the patent. Indeed, the Biogaran product is a zinc form of rosuvastatin, and zinc does not belong to the alcaline or alcaline earth metal families.

And now comes the last part of the judgment, which deals with an auxiliary argument by the claimants, which was articulated as follows:

Biogaran commits acts of contributory infringement because it provides essential means for implementing the invention [….]. The salt form under which rosuvastatin is administered decomposes as follows, as soon as it reaches the gastro-intestinal system of the patient. The salt is dissolved, which leads to the separation of the cation (for example the calcium or zinc ion) and of the anion (namely rosuvastatin in anionic form). Since the pH of the stomach is low (less than the pKa of the acid group of rosuvastatin), the rosuvastatin anion surrounded by H+ protons attracts them so as to make the free acid form of rosuvastatin. […] Therefore the invention is implemented in vivo, in the patient’s stomach, after the administration of the Biogaran rosuvastatin, which thus infringes the EP’471 patent by contributory infringement. 

An interesting theory, but which did not hold water for the judge:

The act of infringement in suit can only be the supply or marketing of the drug, and not the decomposition of the drug in the patient’s body. […]

Contrary to what is argued by the plaintiffs, contributory infringement does not consist in providing means allowing the decomposition of the rosuvastatin salt in anionic rosuvastatin and salt in the human body. This is a consequence of the ingestion of the drug in the body, and of its mode of action but it is not an essential means of the invention, which only relates to the formulation of the rosuvastatin tablet. […]

[Contributory infringement] cannot be relied upon in the context of an artificial auxiliary argument […] whereas the Biogaran product is a generic of Crestor and thus clearly intended for the same therapeutic indication.

Biogaran does not supply any means but a product equivalent to the one protected by the EP’471 patent and the SPC so that contributory infringement is neither established nor likely.

The reasoning is very clear. Contributory infringement is a notion intended to target suppliers of only part of an invention. It is “artificial” and therefore wrong to try to extend this notion to the situation of a drug which undergoes a chemical transformation into a patented compound only in the patient’s body.

It is remarkable, though, that the judge noted in passing that the Biogaran product is equivalent to the claimed invention. It seems that the plaintiffs did not argue infringement under the doctrine of equivalence. Would the outcome have been different if they had? Maybe we will find out with the case on the merits (assuming it proceeds to trial).


CASE REFERENCE: Tribunal de grande instance de Paris, ordonnance de référé, July 4, 2016, Shionigi Seiyaku Kabushiki Kaisha & Astrazeneca UK Ltd v. Biogaran, RG No. 16/56067.

Protocol not recognized

Another week, another issue of international jurisdiction. Last week’s post was about a case of declaration of non-infringement. This week’s post is about a case of ownership claim. But I think this time the decision issued by a French judge has a greater potential for arousing controversy.

In short: the judge decided that the Protocol on Recognition should be discarded in the determination of jurisdiction in the case at hand. The “Protocol on Recognition” is short for “Protocol on Jurisdiction and the Recognition of Decisions in respect of the Right to the Grant of a European Patent“. The object of the Protocol is to define which courts of the EPC contracting states shall have jurisdiction to decide claims, against the applicant, to the right to the grant of a European patent.

Pursuant to Article 164(1) EPC, the Protocol is considered as an “integral part” of the EPC, and therefore is part of an international agreement. So, I think the decision by the judge not to apply the Protocol is a pretty big deal.

Let’s turn to the specifics of the case. This is a dispute between a British company, NCAM Technologies Ltd. and a French company, Solidanim, both active in the field of motion picture technology. Both hold IP on similar technologies, respectively called NCAM Live and SolidTrack.

Solidanim filed a French patent application in December 2011, followed by a European patent application in December 2012, claiming the priority of the French application. The French patent was granted, and the European application is still pending.

NCAM Technologies Ltd. filed a British patent application in May 2012, followed by another British patent application and a PCT application in May 2013, claiming the priority of the initial 2012 filing. The PCT application entered regional phase at the EPO.

Filing date 1918 – the early days of cartoon technology.

Apparently, Solidanim told clients that NCAM had stolen its SolidTrack technology. NCAM did not like that and sued Solidanim in front of the Paris Tribunal de grande instance (TGI) in October 2015. NCAM requested that Solidanim’s French patent be held invalid, and that Solidanim be declared guilty of unfair competition due to disparagement.

In March 2016, Solidanim counterclaimed for infringement of its French patent and of its European patent application and for unfair competition.

Even more importantly for the present post, Solidanim claimed ownership of NCAM’s British patent, PCT application and resulting European application.

In June 2016, NCAM retaliated by presenting the case management judge with a number of procedural requests:

  • that the proceedings should be stayed with respect to Solidanim’s infringement claims;
  • that the proceedings should continue with respect to NCAM’s nullity claim; and
  • that the court should acknowledge its lack of jurisdiction with respect to Solidanim’s ownership claim.

This leads us to the order issued by the case management judge in November 2016. The first request was quite easily granted. Indeed, infringement proceedings based on a pending European patent application are stayed as of right (article L. 615-4 Code de la propriété intellectuelle). Furthermore, infringement proceedings based on a French patent are also stayed as of right if there is a parallel European patent application which is still pending (article L. 614-15 Code de la propriété intellectuelle). This is because the French patent is bound to totally or partially disappear after the grant of the European patent (more specifically, at the end of the opposition time limit or at the end of the opposition proceedings, if any).

Turning to the second request, there was no mandatory rule for the judge to follow. He had discretion whether to proceed further or to stay. He decided to stay, “for a good administration of justice“, according to the ritual phrase, due to the parallel European patent application still being examined at the EPO, and since the fate of the French patent is closely tied to that of the European application.

But the big prize was the third request. NCAM based its request on the Protocol on Recognition, and more specifically article 2:

Subject to Articles 4 and 5, if an applicant for a European patent has his residence or principal place of business within one of the Contracting States, proceedings shall be brought against him in the courts of that Contracting State.

Articles 4 and 5 are irrelevant here, as they relate to employees’ inventions and cases in which there is a preexisting agreement with a jurisdiction clause in place between the parties.

So, this is quite straightforward. According to article 2 of the Protocol, the British courts should have exclusive jurisdiction to rule on Solidanim’s claim for ownership of NCAM’s European application, since NCAM has its principal place of business in the UK.

However, Solidanim relied on the Brussels I regulation, namely regulation (EU) No. 1215/2012, already discussed last week. More specifically, Solidanim relied on article 8(3) of the regulation, per which:

A person domiciled in a Member State may also be sued: […] (3) on a counter-claim arising from the same contract or facts on which the original claim was based, in the court in which the original claim is pending.

Claims were already pending in the Paris TGI due to NCAM’s original complaint. Solidanim’s case was that their ownership counterclaim arose from the same facts on which the original nullity and unfair competition claims were based. As a result, the French court also had jurisdiction under the Brussels I regulation.

The judge thus had to address two questions:

  • First, as a matter of fact, did Solidanim’s ownership counterclaim indeed arise from the same facts on which the original claims were based?
  • Second, as a matter of law, which provisions should prevail: those of the Protocol on Recognition or those of the Brussels I regulation?

As to the first point, the judge agreed with Solidanim that the conditions of article 8(3) of the regulation were met:

[…] The latter claims are closely related to the circumstances of fact and relations between the parties, which need to be assessed so as to determine whether the filings made by NCAM did or did not violate Solidanim’s rights on the FR’057 patent, the validity of which is challenged in front of the Parisian court. 

I am not sure I fully understand why a nullity claim concerning one patent is necessarily closely related to an ownership claim concerning other, later applications by another party – apart from the general background of the case. On the other hand, it seems quite clear that NCAM’s unfair competition / disparagement original claim was closely related to Solidanim’s ownership counterclaim. In both cases, the issue, to put it bluntly, was whether or not NCAM had “stolen” Solidanim’s technology.

But the legal issue is certainly the most interesting one. Both the Protocol and the regulation contain some general provisions on how they should be articulated with other legal instruments.

On the one hand, according to article 11(1) of the Protocol:

In relations between any Contracting States the provisions of this Protocol shall prevail over any conflicting provisions of other agreements on jurisdiction or the recognition of judgments.

So the Protocol proclaims itself to be superior to any other agreement. But the regulation is not an agreement. It is a piece of EU law.

On the other hand, the regulation contains an entire chapter (articles 67 to 73) on its relationship with other instruments. This chapter contains general guidance and some specific provisions, but no specific provisions regarding the Protocol on Recognition.

So the judge turned to a CJEU decision relevant for this issue, namely C-533/08 (TNT Express Nederland BV v. AXA Versicherung AG) of May 4, 2010. This decision deals with the articulation between regulation (EC) No. 44/2001, which was the previous version of the Brussels I regulation, and an international agreement, namely the Convention on the Contract for the International Carriage of Goods by Road, signed in Geneva in 1956.

The court interpreted article 71 of regulation 44/2001 as meaning that:

in a case such as the main proceedings, the rules governing jurisdiction, recognition and enforcement that are laid down by a convention on a particular matter […] apply provided that they are highly predictable, facilitate the sound administration of justice and enable the risk of concurrent proceedings to be minimised and that they ensure, under conditions at least as favourable as those provided for by the regulation, the free movement of judgments in civil and commercial matters and mutual trust in the administration of justice in the European Union (favor executionis).

Article 71 of regulation 1215/2012 is similar to article 71 of regulation 44/2001. Therefore, the judge applied the criteria set by the supreme court of the EU, based on the premise that the same criteria should apply whatever the international agreement at stake is.

The judge acknowledged that the Protocol on Recognition affords a high degree of predictability.

However, turning to the objectives of sound administration of justice and of minimizing the risk of concurrent proceedings, the judge noted that the claims and counterclaims at stake were so closely related that the sound administration of justice and the minimization of the risk of concurrent proceedings were better served if all claims and counterclaims were handled by the same court.

The judge noted that

On the one hand, the [NCAM] patents relate to a system similar to the one claimed by Solidanim in its FR’057 patent, in that they deal with real-time merging or composing of computer-generated 3D objects and a video stream from a video camera. And on the other hand, the ownership claims rely on the same factual circumstances relating to the relationships between the parties and their employees, which lead them both to claim a primacy on the inventions provided in these different patents or applications and to consider that the statements made by the parties against each other constitute acts of unfair competition. 

Consequently, said the judge, the Protocol for Recognition did not pass the test set in C-533/08 in the present circumstances, and it should thus simply be ignored, to the benefit of the Brussels I regulation.

Let’s see how this case further develops. It could even be a matter for further reference to the CJEU down the road, could it not?

As a side note, in a few years’ time, I assume that the Brussels I regulation will no longer apply to the UK, so that a similar situation will have to be handled completely differently.


CASE REFERENCE: Tribunal de grande instance, 3ème chambre 2ème section, ordonnance du juge de la mise en état, November 24, 2016, NCAM Technologies Ltd. v. Solidanim, RG No. 15/15648.

Borderline

Cross-border litigation is a relatively uncommon but quite fascinating area of European patent law. I naively view it as a fairytale land of Italian torpedoes and Dutch spiders.

So I found it very interesting when I read a recent French decision in which the judge crossed the borderline and trod this unbeaten path.

In this case, several companies, including UK-based Furnace Solutions Ltd. and other French related companies, as well as one individual, filed a declaratory action of non-infringement in front of the Paris Tribunal de grande instance (TGI) against the French company CTP Environnement, as the owner of European patent No. EP 1528318.

Remarkably, the plaintiffs asked the French court to declare that both the French part and the British part of the patent are not infringed. The patent proprietor claimed that the TGI lacks jurisdiction. Such a procedural defense was addressed not by the full panel of the court but by the case management judge, in an order dated November 18, 2016.

The pan-European litigation game.

In brief, the judge rejected the lack of jurisdiction defense, and thus decided that the case could proceed further and that the TGI could rule on the declaratory claims with respect to both France and the UK.

In order to reach this conclusion, the judge reviewed the atlas of cross-border litigation, namely the so-called Brussels I regulation, formerly regulation (EC) No. 44/2001, still formerly known as the 1968 Brussels Convention, and nowadays known as regulation (EU) No. 1215/2012.

The central issue at stake was the articulation between articles 4(1) and 24(4) of the regulation.

According to article 4(1):

Subject to this Regulation, persons domiciled in a Member State shall, whatever their nationality, be sued in the courts of that Member State.

An action for declaration of non-infringement is a lawsuit against the patent proprietor. Therefore, this provision apparently makes it possible for a third party to file a declaratory action relating to any national part of a European patent in the courts of the country in which the patent proprietor has its seat.

In the present case, CTP Environnement is based in France, which is why the action was filed in front of the Paris TGI.

But in IP matters there is a limit to this general jurisdiction rule, which is set in article 24(4):

The following courts of a Member State shall have exclusive jurisdiction, regardless of the domicile of the parties: […]  in proceedings concerned with the registration or validity of patents, trade marks, designs, or other similar rights required to be deposited or registered, irrespective of whether the issue is raised by way of an action or as a defence, the courts of the Member State in which the deposit or registration has been applied for, has taken place or is under the terms of an instrument of the Union or an international convention deemed to have taken place. Without prejudice to the jurisdiction of the European Patent Office under the Convention on the Grant of European Patents, signed at Munich on 5 October 1973, the courts of each Member State shall have exclusive jurisdiction in proceedings concerned with the registration or validity of any European patent granted for that Member State.

So the courts of each country have exclusive jurisdiction with respect to any issues of “registration” (whatever that means) and validity (well, we know what that means) of the respective national parts of a European patent. In other terms, nullity of the UK part of a European patent cannot be requested in France, it has to be requested in the UK.

According to the CJEU case C-4/03 (GAT v. LuK), exclusive jurisdiction as defined above applies in “all proceedings where the validity of the patent is decisive, irrespective of whether this is raised by way of an action or a plea in objection“. In other terms, not only invalidity claims or counterclaims, but also invalidity defenses are forbidden territory for cross-border litigation. This has actually been made clearer in the above version of article 24 than it was in the original 1968 Brussels Convention based on which GAT v. LuK was issued.

CTP’s defense in the present case was that a declaratory action may very well give rise to an infringement counterclaim, and then a nullity counter-counterclaim. Therefore, should the French court accept to hear the UK part of the declaratory action, it could impinge on prohibited UK-only validity issues.

In addition, the complaint made reference to a possible objection of extension of subject-matter of the patent, which meant that the validity of the patent would be challenged.

The judge rejected these arguments with the following brief reasoning:

In the present case, and at the present stage, the lawsuit concerns a claim for declaration of non-infringement without for the time being any counterclaim for infringement by CTP nor any claim for nullity of the UK part of the allegedly infringed patent, which would then be a matter for jurisdiction of British courts. 

Therefore, at the present stage of the lawsuit, article 24(4) […] is not applicable. Since the defendant has its seat in France, the present court has jurisdiction based on article 4 […] so that the defense of lack of jurisdiction must be rejected. 

It is clear from the above statements that the situation may change and that there may be a lack of jurisdiction in the future, if further claims are filed. What is less clear is whether only an invalidity claim by Furnace Solutions et al. would trigger this lack of jurisdiction, or whether also an infringement counterclaim by CTP would lead to the same result.

At any rate, the approach taken by the French judge in Furnace Solutions seems to be consistent with the outcome of the Actavis v. Eli Lilly pemetrexed case in the UK, where the British courts ruled on a declaration of non-infringement of a European patent in the UK but also France, Italy and Spain. See for instance the second pemetrexed appeal judgment dated 2015 here. In this case as well, the validity of the patent was expressly not challenged.

Together with the C-616/10 Solvay v. Honeywell CJEU ruling of 2012, which reopened the door to cross-border injunctions in the form of interim relief, these cases could pave the way for a revival of cross-border litigation – pending the UPC big bang.

As a final remark to those eager to follow in the footsteps of Furnace Solutions Ltd., the admissibility of a declaration of non-infringement in France is subject to a mandatory stage of pre-litigation negotiation.

Article L. 615-9 Code de la propriété intellectuelle provides that:

Any person who proves exploiting industrially on the territory of a Member State of the European Economic Community, or serious and effective preparations to that effect, may invite the owner of a patent to take position on the opposability of his title against such industrial exploitation, the description of which shall be communicated to him.

If said person challenges the answer made, or if the patent proprietor does not take position within a deadline of three months, they can sue to have a court rule that the patent does not impede said exploitation, without prejudice to a patent nullity action and to a later infringement action if the exploitation is not conducted in the terms specified in the description mentioned in the previous paragraph. 

In summary, prior notice to the patent proprietor is mandatory. Furthermore, in view of the three-month deadline, it seems virtually impossible to validly launch a surprise declaratory action in this country.


CASE REFERENCE: Tribunal de grande instance de Paris, 3ème chambre 2ème section, ordonnance du juge de la mise en état, November 18, 2016, Furnace Solutions Ltd. et al. v. CTP Environnement, RG No. 15/06637.