It-which-must-not-be-named

Some pharma cases are somewhat delicate to discuss in a blog post.

Case in point, if I provide the commercial name of the drug at stake in today’s litigation, I am afraid that this post may be classified as a spam and may thus never reach my email subscribers.

You see, it is the sort of drug which is prescribed for the treatment of erectile dysfunction, and which keeps coming up in these pestering unsolicited email messages that you may receive on a daily basis.

Just to be clear, today’s drug-which-must-not-be-named is not the famous one that starts with a V (containing sildenafil as an active compound), but the other famous one that starts with a C (containing tadalafil as an active compound).

He-who-must-not-be-named.

Icos Corporation (of the Eli Lilly group) is the owner of a number of European patents in connection with the C. drug.

First, there is EP 0740668, which was the basic patent for a French Supplementary Protection Certificate (SPC No. FR 03C0017), which expired in November 2017. Second, there are EP 1173181 and EP 1200092, designated as “secondary patents” by the Paris Tribunal de grande instance (TGI).

In November 2014, generic drug company Mylan obtained a marketing authorization (MA) related to the C. drug. In January 2016, Mylan initiated nullity proceedings with respect to the EP’181 and EP’092 patents in front of the Paris TGI. The parties later reached a settlement agreement with respect to EP’092, so that only the fate of EP’181 remained to be decided upon. Icos Corporation and the French distributor Lilly France counterclaimed for infringement of EP’181. The first instance judgment was issued in May 2018.

EP’181 or equivalents thereof were or are also litigated in other countries. According to the summary provided by the court, the patents were revoked in Germany, the United Kingdom, Canada and Japan. It may thus come as little surprising that the same outcome was achieved in this country. On the other hand, the ground for nullity that the TGI took into consideration is relatively unexpected, as will be apparent below.

But before getting there, let’s first look at the statute of limitations defense raised by Icos.

Mylan argued that the statute of limitations is not applicable to patent nullity suits. This argument was rejected by the court, in keeping with earlier decisions.

Turning to the determination of the starting point for the limitation period, the court recalled its now established principle of an in concreto determination.

The court thus explained that the grant of the EP’181 patent was not the starting point for the limitation period. The general principle is the following:

The starting point for the limitation period must thus be set at the date, determined in concreto, at which Mylan was or should have been aware of EP’181, due to its intent to market a generic of the drug [C.], which led to the MA obtained on November 21, 2014, since this patent is an impediment to its exploitation.  

In this case, a determining factor to be taken into account was the date at which Icos obtained its own MA:

In this case, the first MA for [C.] was granted in November 2002. By way of application of article R. 5121-28 of the Code de la santé publique, the generic company can only apply for an MA as from the eighth year after the grant of the originator’s MA, and cannot be granted one before the tenth year. Therefore, Mylan could not file an MA application before November 2010.

This reasoning is fully consistent with that applied in another recent case which already involved Mylan.

However, this is not the end of the story here. The court further held:

In this case, an additional fact should be taken into account in the in concreto analysis of standing and the starting point for the limitation period. […] [Namely, Icos corporation] filed a request for limitation of the EP’181 patent on February 14, 2014 with the European patent office, and the limitation of the patent was published on March 25, 2015. 

Thus the patent enforceable against Mylan could only be known on this date, so that the starting point for the limitation period is March 25, 2015. 

In another recent case, the starting point of the limitation period was postponed by a court to the date of the decision of the Board of appeal of the EPO in the opposition appeal regarding the patent at stake. The relevant paragraph of this decision may be worth quoting again here:

[…] It is only on [July, 7, 2014, i.e. the date of the Board of appeal’s decision] that the drafting of the patent which is sought to be revoked was stabilized and that Ethypharm was able to precisely know the content of the claims of said patent as well as all the facts making it possible for them to act, so that the action is not time-barred and is admissible. 

We now have a confirmation that limitation proceedings, just like opposition proceedings, may result in a postponement of the limitation period for nullity actions.

It remains to be seen how general this principle is and in particular whether it extends e.g. to the impact of other lawsuits involving third parties.

Turning now to the merits of the case, claim 1 of EP’181 as limited reads as follows:

A pharmaceutical unit dosage composition comprising 1 to 5 mg of [tadalafil], said unit dosage form suitable for oral administration up to a maximum total dose of 5 mg per day.

Independent claim 10 is a Swiss-type claim containing similar features.

Mylan raised all classical grounds for nullity, but the court focused on insufficiency of disclosure.

After reviewing the description of the patent, the court noted the following facts:

  • There are several molecules belonging to the class of type 5 phosphodiesterase (PDE5) inhibitors.
  • Among them, particular reference may be made to sildenafil, the active compound of V., marketed at the priority date of the patent in doses of 25, 50 and 100 mg.
  • However, sildenafil generates a number of side effects, such as facial red patches, or a lowering of blood pressure.
  • The invention thus relates to a low dosage of the known alternative drug tadalafil, in order to provide an effective treatment of erectile dysfunction without the side effects associated with sildenafil.
  • The patent also contains a number of examples showing the efficacy and the absence of side effects of low dosage forms of tadalafil.

The court was apparently quite puzzled by the patent as a whole:

The problem expressed in the description of the patent is to provide a principle which avoids the issues of red patches and side effects of sildenafil by a particular dosage of tadalafil. 

Indeed, and as rightly noted by Mylan, no side effect associated with tadalafil is mentioned in the patent, so that the dosage suggested for tadalafil curiously addresses a problem associated with another active compound. 

The court then referred to a standard mentioned in the so-called “finasteride” judgment of December 6, 2017 by the Cour de cassation, commented on this blog:

[…] When a claim relates to a [second] therapeutic application of a substance or composition, obtaining this therapeutic effect is a functional technical feature of the claim. Therefore, in order to meet the requirement of sufficiency of disclosure, it is not necessary to clinically demonstrate this technical effect; but the patent application must directly and unambiguously reflect the claimed therapeutic application, so that the skilled person can understand, based on commonly accepted models, that the results reflect this therapeutic application.

The court then came back to the technical problem presented in the patent:

Icos Corporation and Eli Lilly do not dispute that no prior art document describes any side effect related to the use of tadalafil.
And they cannot validly argue that the absence of documentation in this respect does not amount to the absence of a problem, because the onus is on them to show that there was a problem to be solved and that it is solved by the teaching of the patent.
It thus appears that the problem described in the patent relates to sildenafil and not tadalafil, and it cannot be extrapolated that both active compounds have the same side effects, unless one were to admit the resolution of artificial or speculative problems.
In fact, the examples cited in the patent demonstrate that the dosage mentioned in the patent does not address the listed “problems”. 

In summary, the problem to be solved cannot be considered as the reduction in the side effects of tadalafil, because such side effects were not known in the prior art – only side effects of sildenafil were known.

Most of the examples of the patent also do not demonstrate the existence of side effects of tadalafil associated with higher dosages, so that these were held not to “reflect” the alleged therapeutic application (using the wording of the Cour de cassation).

The conclusion reached by the three-judge panel will not doubt cause a stir, as the invention recited in claim 1 was found not to be sufficiently disclosed in the patent.

The finasteride case related to a second therapeutic application invention, for a known molecule. It is well accepted both at the EPO and in French national courts that the new therapeutic application has to be demonstrated in a plausible manner in the patent, otherwise the patent is insufficient.

Yet, in the present case, claim 1 is a classical product claim, with no functional feature. According to EPO case law, there should be no problem of insufficiency of disclosure, because the skilled person is able to manufacture the composition containing the active substance at stake in the claimed dosage range. The question of whether said claimed dosage range provides any technical benefit or not only pertains to the appraisal of inventive step.

Now, as regular readers of this blog are well aware, the French approach to validity is much more fluid than the EPO’s.

If a court is convinced that an invention does not properly solve the alleged technical problem, or that the technical problem is artificial, this can give rise to a number of invalidity objections, including insufficiency of disclosure. My understanding is that the technical problem tends to be viewed by French courts as an integral part of the claimed invention itself.

But there is yet another cause for controversy in the judgment.

I mentioned above that most of the examples of the patent do not demonstrate the existence of side effects of tadalafil associated with higher dosages. That said, there is one example, namely example 7, which does analyze in detail the occurrence of various side effects depending on the dosage of tadalafil. The table of results is in fact even reproduced in the judgment. The court first remarked that some side effects are not present at all at any dosage. So far so good. But, regarding those side effects which are indeed shown to be less frequent in the claimed dosage range than at a higher dosage, the court noted:

Regarding headache, back pain and myalgia […], the reasoning is the same because these effects were never previously observed.

This part of the judgment seems to imply that, at least in the context of drug dosage patents, the existence of the technical problem to be solved must be acknowledged in the prior art, and cannot be demonstrated for the first time in the patent itself.

The invention can thus not be a so-called “problem invention“.

Things should be put into perspective, though, and the present case may not necessarily be generalized. Maybe the court did not believe that example 7 was convincing at all. At the very least, the fact that the dosage originally claimed in the patent, namely from 1 to 20 mg, had to be later restricted to 1 to 5 mg, due to some relevant prior art, certainly contributed to the court’s perception of the patent being invalid.

In fact, the court reviewed all the following claims and concluded that they suffered from the same deficiencies as claim 1, mentioning a lack of inventive step in passing for some of them. Fluidity of the grounds for nullity indeed.

As a final note, this is probably one of the last judgments penned by Ms. Courboulay, who, given her seniority and her involvement in many conferences and events, was often considered as the leading judge in the 3rd (IP) chamber of the Paris TGI.

Ms. Courboulay has now officially retired; but given the large number of important rulings which she authored, there is little doubt that her influence will continue to be felt in the coming years.


CASE REFERENCE: Tribunal de grande instance de Paris, 3ème chambre 1ère section, April 5, 2018, Mylan v. Lilly France & Icos Corporation, RG No.16/05073.

Judgment in the box

The burden of proof. A concept with a well-deserved name.

It can indeed be a real burden for a patent proprietor to find clear and convincing evidence that a patent is infringed; or for a defendant to find clear and convincing evidence that the invention was disclosed by the proprietor before the filing date.

The case discussed today illustrates both situations.

In this case, all litigants are from the Toulouse area. Construction Machines Automatiques Spéciales (CMAS) owns French patent No. FR 2755655, filed in 1996, which expired during litigation. The patent relates to a carton making machine.

The main defendants are: LB Pack, a company created in 2012 a few kilometers away from CMAS; and two ex-employees of CMAS, who also happen to be the founders of LB Pack.

CMAS filed claims of patent infringement and unfair competition against these three defendants. The defendants counterclaimed inter alia for patent nullity.

The first notable question raised in this case is whether the nullity counterclaim was time-barred.

As reported last week, the statute of limitations will no longer be applicable to any patent nullity claim if and when the UPC Agreement enters into force. But in the meantime we have to continue dealing with it and the legal uncertainty that it entails.

Quite surprisingly, the court disposed of this issue in a short paragraph, briefly noting, as if it were self-evident, that the statute of limitations is not applicable to nullity claims when they are raised as counterclaims.

An interesting development indeed, as it was previously held in other cases that nullity counterclaims are to be treated in the same manner as direct nullity claims – with the caveat that, if a defendant is time-barred, nullity can always be raised as a defense (exception) to the effect that the patent should not be enforceable against them, even if the patent is not formally revoked.

Stay tuned to check whether this new approach will hold.

The wonderful things you can make out of cardboard.

The main invalidity argument raised by LB Pack et al. was that CMAS (formerly CMA) had disclosed the invention before filing by showing and selling so-called Minicompact machines.

By way of an interesting strategy, the defendants requested and obtained an ex parte order from a judge allowing them to perform an inspection by a bailiff with a third party, the company Stendhal, that had bought a Minicompact machine in 1995.

The bailiff’s report proved the acquisition of the machine before the filing date of the patent. But the court was not convinced that this machine anticipated the patent claims. The main reason for this was that the machine was subjected to several servicing operations since 1995, including an important compliance operation in 2004, performed by CMAS. In other terms, the court believed that the machine may have been altered, and that the copy inspected by the bailiff during litigation may not be representative of the machine bought in 1995. Thus, the benefit of the doubt was given to the patent proprietor – who was apparently not required to demonstrate that they had indeed modified the machine in a way which would be relevant to the patent in suit.

The patent was thus declared valid.

Turning now to infringement, the shoe was on the the other foot.

An infringement seizure report had been drawn up by a bailiff. This proved that LB Pack had sold one machine to a third party, Sicaf. But the issue was the description of the allegedly infringing machine.

In fact, the bailiff was only able to inspect an unfinished machine, not yet operational, and with some parts not yet assembled. But, said the court, analyzing whether the characterizing portion of the main claim of the patent was implemented by LB Pack could only be done based on a fully assembled machine.

The other documents and evidence found by CMAS did not make it possible to know whether the subject-matter of the patent claims was implemented or not.

As a result, the infringement claim was rejected.

That said, the defendants were not off the hook, as they were found guilty of unfair competition.

It turns out that the bailiff conducting the infringement seizure found evidence that the two ex-employees who founded LB Pack had extensively copied business and technical information belonging to CMAS before leaving. Also, at the time they left the company, they had accessed and taken advantage of one CAD license belonging to CMAS.

The assessment of the court as to the consequences of these illegal actions was then the following:

Even if it is not demonstrated that LB Pack makes and markets machines which infringe CMAS’ patent, it remains that all the saved technical data belonging to CMAS necessarily and unjustifiably made it easier to create new machines which could be very quickly put on the market by LB Pack as from 2013, on the same market, which conferred them an undue competitive advantage.

Finally, it can be derived from the invoices annexed to the infringement seizure report that, owing to the customer and prospect files copied on the laptop of Mr. […], it was easier for LB Pack to solicit customers and thus market its machine more easily notably with Schneider and Durlin which were already customers of CMAS. The misappropriation of customers is thus demonstrated and is an act of unfair competition and free-riding. In view of the invoices from LB Pack seized by the bailiff, the court knows that 3 machines were sold starting from July 2013 for an amount of 235,000 euros, notably to Sicaf, which was a prospect of CMAS, and that maintenance services were also sold to Schneider and Durlin, customers of CMAS. 

Therefore, the acts of unfair competition and free-riding are serious and repeated and the compensation for the harm caused should be set to 80,000 euros. 

One remark here is that an infringement seizure is a procedure specifically intended to gather evidence of patent infringement. However, even in the absence of patent infringement, the evidence found during the seizure can be used against the defendant with respect to other claims, notably in relation with unfair competition.


CASE REFERENCE: Tribunal de grande instance de Paris, 3ème chambre 4ème section, March 15, 2008, SARL Construction Machines Automatiques Spéciales v. SARL LB Pack et al., RG No. 14/16600.

Getting ready

Little by little, everything seems to finally come into place for the kick off of the UPC – pending the outcome of the constitutional complaint in Germany.

A major step has now been taken in France, with a modification of the Code de la propriété intellectuelle (CPI) to make national law ready for the UPC, by way of an executive order dated May 9.

And one of the most important amendments thus introduced… well in fact has little do with the UPC, and everything to do with this very French debate on the statute of limitations applicable to patent nullity actions.

Indeed, a new article L. 615-8-1 is introduced, per which the statute of imitations is simply not applicable to patent nullity actions. So, back to the situation that everyone took for granted ten years ago, and back into line with the practice of other European countries. Very good news indeed.

But, there is a but, or actually two.

First, this new provision will only come into force when the UPC agreement comes into force – since the overall purpose of the order is the application of the UPC agreement. Second, the new provision will not be applicable to nullity actions which are already time-barred at the time the provision comes into force.

So you can still expect a lot of discussion for a few more years on how the statute of limitations should be applied and how the limitation period should be computed, before this really becomes history.

Waiting for the entry into force.

Now, back to the other, truly UPC-related provisions. One important aspect is how double protection by a French patent and a European patent for the same invention is handled.

The current situation is that, when a French patent and a European patent granted to the same inventor or successor in title cover the same invention and have the same priority date, the French patent ceases to be in force at the expiry of the 9-month European opposition period (if no opposition is filed) or when the opposition proceedings are closed, the patent being “maintained” (either in amended form or as granted).

Under the new version of article L 614-13 CPI, this remains the case, but only for European patents that have been opted out from the exclusive competence of the UPC (under article 83 of the Agreement). For non-opted out European patents (including of course unitary patents) on the contrary, there will no longer be any such so-called substitution. Thus, applicants will be able to secure both a national patent, enforceable in front of our national courts, and a European patent enforceable in front of the UPC, for the same invention. This is of course primarily of interest for French applicants who do their first filings at the INPI and then file at the EPO. But of course foreign applicants could also use this tool, for super-important inventions, by filing at the EPO and then in France, or simultaneously at the EPO and in France.

Now, what happens if a European patent is opted out at a late stage, for instance after the 9-month opposition period? The answer provided in the new law is that double protection then ends at the time of the opt out, i.e. the French patent ceases to be in force on the date of the opt out.

By the way, any substitution is irreversible. If a European patent is invalidated or lapses or if the opt out is withdrawn after a substitution has taken place, the corresponding French patent does not come back to life.

Another amendment relates to the prohibition to transfer, or to grant rights on, a French patent or application independently from a European patent or application, for the same invention, having the same priority date, and filed by the same inventor or successor in title.

This prohibition remains in place for all non-opted out European patents (including unitary patents), as well as opted out European patents (before the substitution takes place). In addition, the recordal of a transfer at the French national patent register is only effective if a parallel recordal has taken place at the European national patent register.

Next topic, a particular procedural rule in connection with patent litigation.

Currently, if a French patent is asserted and there is a corresponding European patent or application, the court stays the proceedings as of right until the substitution takes place, or until the European patent or application disappears (by way of a withdrawal, refusal, revocation, etc.) before any substitution takes place. This rule will remain in place but solely for opted out European patents. When a non-opted out European patent / application is present, an action based on the French patent will be able to proceed independently of the fate of the European patent / application. It remains to be seen how this will play out in practice. The court will still have the possibility to order a stay anyway, under the general rules of civil procedure, if they deem that a stay is appropriate for a good administration of justice.

On a few other aspects, French law has been harmonized with the UPC Agreement.

This is especially the case regarding the wording used to define the acts of infringement and exhaustion of rights. Besides, non-exclusive licensees will now be allowed to assert a patent if this is expressly authorized by the license agreement, and provided that the patent proprietor is given prior notice. This is a new possibility under French law, which mirrors article 47(3) of the UPC Agreement.

The limitation period for infringement damages remains five years but the starting point will now be the date on which the applicant became aware, or had reasonable grounds to become aware, of the last fact justifying the action, in keeping with article 72 of the Agreement. In the current version of article L. 615-8 CPI, the starting point is “the facts” on which the action is based. The effect of this significant modification will be twofold: right holders will in some cases be able to claim more damages; and more complex debates regarding the determination of the starting point of the limitation period can be expected, as the new definition is more fuzzy than the traditional one.

Last but not least, new article L. 615-18 CPI clarifies that the UPC shall have exclusive jurisdiction over unitary patents and non-opted out traditional European patents.

So, now that the rules of the game are known, all readers can start looking for potential loopholes or ambiguities, and imagining unusual scenarios. Isn’t this what new laws are primarily for?

Will case law crystallize?

Today, it is back again to one of the topics regularly addressed on this blog, namely the statute of limitations for patent nullity actions in France (but not only!).

Matthieu Dhenne was kind enough to send me a brand new decision from the Paris Tribunal de grande instance (TGI) which, once more, sheds new light on this thorny issue.

The patent at stake is the French part of EP 1455756, to Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp. (MSD). The patent was granted on July 9, 2008. It was opposed by two generic drug manufacturers. At first instance, the patent was maintained in amended form, according to a decision dated December 3, 2010. The opponents appealed, and their appeals were dismissed by the Board of appeal in a decision dated July 17, 2014. The publication of the amended patent took place on September 23, 2015.

Soon thereafter, on December 2, 2015, Ethypharm filed a nullity action with the Paris TGI, requesting that the French part of the patent should be revoked.

Quite predictably, MSD argued that the nullity action was time-barred.

If one directly applied the recent case law of the Paris Cour d’appel (discussed here), this should be a winning argument. Indeed, the Cour d’appel has proposed that the five year-limitation period be computed from the date of grant of the patent. With this in mind, in this case, the limitation period would have ended on July 9, 2013.

But you and I know that things are not that straightforward, as the Paris TGI does not follow the case law of the upper court, and generally favors an in concreto determination of the starting point for the limitation period (see a recent example here).

Yet, in today’s ruling you will not find any protracted discussion of an in concreto starting point. Instead, the issue is disposed of in just one paragraph:

[…] It is only on [July, 7, 2014, i.e. the date of the Board of appeal’s decision] that the drafting of the patent which is sought to be revoked was stabilized and that Ethypharm was able to precisely know the content of the claims of said patent as well as all the facts making it possible for them to act, so that the action is not time-barred and is admissible. 

I must say I have mixed feelings about this.

My initial reaction was, oh no, you must be kidding me, there is now yet another way of determining the starting point for the limitation period? This is not legal uncertainty anymore, this is legal chaos.

A few seconds later, I thought, well yes, it does make sense after all, you can’t possibly be expected to shoot at a moving target. When a patent is modified during opposition proceedings, any appeal filed at the EPO has a suspensive effect, and thus it is only once the appeal proceedings are terminated that the content of the patent is final.

A party must act within five years from the date at which they knew or should have known that the patent at stake is a possible impediment for their current or future business activities, or else be time-barred (this is more or less what I understand to be the TGI’s usual position). And how can a party know this before the patent is even its final form?

However, this ruling raises more questions than it provides answers.

What if an opposition is rejected by the opposition division and the patent thus maintained as granted instead of as amended? Should the reasoning be the same? What if an opposition is filed by a straw man (which is allowable at the EPO) and there is thus an unverifiable suspicion that the nullity claimant itself may be the true opponent, in an attempt to artificially extend the limitation period by several years?

In his message to me, Matthieu Dhenne also noted that the court’s reasoning could be applicable to other situations: limitation proceedings, but also a prior nullity suit brought forward by a third party. Taking this one step further, he observed that a patent right can in fact be modified at any time and is therefore theoretically never “stabilized” until it expires (sometimes, it can even be retroactively “stabilized” only after its expiry). He thus suggested that the full consequence of the court’s reasoning should be that the limitation period can only start running at the expiry of the patent, so that the well-identified drawbacks of this limitation period should in practice never occur.

Matthieu added that there would thus be a complete parallelism between the limitation period for infringement actions and nullity actions. Accordingly, invalid patents would not be able to unduly hinder free competition.

Definitely an interesting suggestion, but is it really what the TGI had in mind? I am quite sure we can expect more surprises in future decisions.

Apart from this, the decision is worth the read beyond the admissibility part.

First, it turns out that the nullity claim was held ill-founded on the merits and thus dismissed. As the patent in suit is a pharma patent, this is already quite remarkable. A majority of pharma patents which are litigated in this country are revoked one way or another.

Second, the decision tackles the very interesting issue of plausibility.

There has been a significant trend in France for patents to be revoked when they are held to be of a speculative nature. See for instance previous posts here, here and there.

In the present case, Ethypharm argued that the patent was of the speculative kind, which resulted in insufficiency of disclosure and lack of inventive step.

Now may be a good time to have a look at claim 1:

A nanoparticulate composition comprising the compound 2-(R)-(1-(R)-(3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)ethoxy)-3-(S)-(4-fluoro)phenyl-4-(3-(5-oxo-1H,4H-1,2,4-triazolo)methylmorpholine, or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof, the compound having adsorbed on the surface thereof at least one surface stabilizer in an amount sufficient to maintain an effective average particle size of less than about 1000 nm; where “effective average particle size of less than about 1000 nm” means that at least 95% of the particles, by weight, have a particle size of less than about 1000 nm.

This drug composition is useful in the treatment of nausea and vomiting, especially those induced by a chemotherapeutic treatment. The short name of the active compound is aprepitant. According to the patent, the technical problem at stake was to improve the bioavailability of aprepitant. This is stated in the patent but no experimental test results are present, which led Ethypharm to consider that there was no evidence in the patent that the technical problem was properly solved.

Ethypharm also tried to use some of MSD’s posterior testing against them, by claiming that they proved that there were features missing in the patent which were essential for successfully implementing the invention.

The court was not convinced that there were indeed such essential features missing. The court also noted that there was a reference in the patent in suit to a prior U.S. patent disclosing the so-called “Nanocrystal” method, for making nanoparticles with a surface modifier adsorbed thereon, having an average size of less than 400 nm. This Nanocrystal patent also taught that such nanoparticles improve the bioavailability of poorly water-soluble actives.

Thus, said the court, the improvement in bioavailability provided by the nanoparticle form of aprepitant was plausible.

In such a case, the court continued, evidence which is external to the patent can indeed be taken into consideration for demonstrating that the technical problem is solved. The court then reviewed a number of articles and reports and was satisfied that the technical effect of improving bioavailability was well achieved.

In summary, this is an important decision for the fine-tuning of the appraisal of a speculative patent-type objection.

To me, the take-away message is that a reference in a patent to a prior art document disclosing a technical effect provides some plausibility that the technical effect is indeed achieved.

From drug crystals to crystal balls: could they possibly help us decipher future case law?

The patent survived other attacks of insufficiency of disclosure, extension of subject-matter and lack of inventive step. Quite remarkably, the main claim was in particular found to be non-obvious over the “Nanocrystal ” European patent of the same family as the U.S. patent mentioned above, which was used for supporting the plausibility of the technical effect.

The court held that:

[The “Nanocrystal” prior art] does not disclose chemical structures or features of drugs intended to be used by this process. It only mentions that it can be implemented with a large variety of medicinal substances, the substance having to be poorly soluble, that is less than 10 mg/mL, so that the skilled person does not know which actives […] can be tested with a reasonable expectation of success. He was all the less incited to do so that in December 2001, i.e. almost ten years after the priority date of [the Nanocrystal patent], the nanonization process, which has a number of constraints (in particular the heat released during milling may change the structure of the active substance and reduction to a very small size may create a problem of chemical and physical stability), was used on only four active substances (danazol, steroid A, compound WIN 63,394 and naproxene) with a verified effect on bioavailability […]. 

I have the uneasy feeling that there may be a contradiction here between the sufficiency and inventive step prongs of the court’s reasoning.

If the teaching of the Nanocrystal patent cannot be applied in an obvious manner to aprepitant, and if there are many technical uncertainties, why is it then not necessary for the MSD patent to contain evidence in the form of experimental tests showing that the process can in fact be effectively applied to this particular drug?


CASE REFERENCE: Tribunal de grande instance de Paris, 3ème chambre 2ème section, January 26, 2018, Ethypharm SAS v. Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp., RG No. 16/01225.

One-two-three

Still warm from the press and courtesy of Matthieu Dhenne, come tidings of the fall of another important pharma IP, namely the Atripla SPC (Supplementary Protection Certificate).

Atripla is marketed as a pink tablet with “123” impressed on one side. It contains a combination of three anti-HIV drugs, namely efavirenz, emtricitabine and tenofovir.

The U.S. pharmaceutical giant Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp. (MSD) owns European patent No. EP 0582455, entitled “benzoxazinones as inhibitors of HIV reverse transcriptase“. The patent was filed on August 3, 1993.

Two SCPs were filed and granted in France based on the EP’455 patent, and on two successive marketing authorizations (MAs):

  • The first one, FR01C0012, was filed on April 10, 2001 and granted on May 18, 2001. It protected the active efavirenz per se. This SPC expired on November 20, 2013.
  • The second one, FR08C0021, was filed on May 27, 2008 and granted on November 20, 2009. It protects the triple therapy combination of efavirenz, emtricitabine and tenofovir (marketed as Atripla) and is set to expire on August 2, 2018.

On September 20, 2016, Mylan initiated legal proceedings against MSD in France, claiming that the FR’021 SPC is invalid. The Paris Tribunal de grande instance (TGI) issued its judgment on November 30, 2017.

The judgment is interesting both regarding the admissibility of the action and  the merits.

As far as admissibility is concerned, the nullity defendant claimed that Mylan was time-barred from requesting the nullity of the SPC.

As a first line of response, Mylan argued that the general statute of limitations in our Code civil, which provides a five-year limitation period for “personal or movable actions“, is not applicable to actions for nullity of an IP right. Unsurprisingly, the court disagreed, in keeping with recent case law at the first instance and appeal levels. The TGI made in particular reference to a trademark ruling by the Cour de cassation dated June 8, 2017. For the court, applying this ruling by analogy leads to the conclusion that an action for revocation of an SPC is indeed subject to the limitation period under ordinary law.

That being said, the real interesting point is the determination of the starting point for the five-year limitation period. Although there has been a lot of discussion (including on this blog) concerning the starting period for patent nullity cases, there has been no clear guidance for SPC nullity actions, as far as I am aware of.

MSD’s case was that the starting point for the limitation period was the publication of the SPC application. The court disagreed and set the following principles.

The starting point for the limitation period must be set to the day, determined in concreto, when Mylan knew or should have known, because it intended to market a generic version of the drug which received an MA on December 13 [2007], for the combination of [the] three actives, which is protected by the SPC, which represents an impediment for its business.

So, we all get the idea there – although a couple of words may be missing, which happens from time to time when your sentences are too long, and this is probably why my blog software keeps blaming me for using more than the recommended threshold of 25% of sentences containing more than 20 words.

The general principle of an in concreto assessment is in keeping with the TGI’s previous decisions in patent revocation cases. The court went on:

[…] Only the SPC matters as an impediment, and not the patent. 

One should not refer to the date of grant of the patent, since the validity of the patent is not challenged by Mylan, which acknowledges that the efavirenz active compound is the subject-matter of the invention protected by the EP’455 patent and then by the [FR’012] SPC which expired on November 20, 2013. 

Only the validity of the [FR’021] SPC […] is challenged […]. 

Thus the publication of the grant of the patent cannot be set as the starting point for the limitation period, as it would in fact require an unrealistic watch from stakeholders and is unrelated to the development of the project which gives standing to sue. 

Mylan’s standing does not derive from the publication of the title, be it the patent or the SPC, but from its concrete intent to market the same drug. 

In this case, they have to check that this intent to market the product does not infringe any IP, and if this is the case, to seek its revocation before launching. 

Watching patent or SPC registers cannot be required from stakeholders before they intend to develop a competing product. 

[…] In the present case, the first MA for Atripla […] was granted on December 13, 2007. In view of article R. 5121-28 of the Code de la santé publique, the generic company can only apply for an MA starting from the eighth year after the grant of the MA for the original drug, and cannot be granted one before ten years. 

Therefore, Mylan could not apply for an MA before December 13, 2015, and could not obtain it before December 13, 2017. As a consequence, the date at which Mylan’s standing can be taken into account is December 13, 2015, which is the date starting from which it could apply for an MA. Thus, Mylan is not time-barred as it had until December 13, 2020 to start legal action.

What is somewhat paradoxical is that the TGI calls for an in concreto appraisal but then defines what could possibly be a general rule for SPC cases, namely that the starting point for the limitation period is the date at which third parties may start applying for their own MAs.

We will need to wait for further cases to know for sure whether this is indeed a general rule or not.

Turning to the merits of the case, the discussion and the ultimate reasoning of the court are extremely similar to what can be found in the recent decision on Truvada, also reported on this blog a few weeks ago. 

Truvada is another anti-HIV drug based on the combination of tenofovir and emtricitabine. The SPC at stake in today’s decision relates to the combination of the same compounds, plus a third one, efavirenz. And the problems raised by this other combination are analogous.

According to article 3(a) of the SPC regulation (regulation (EC) No. 469/2009 of the European Parliament and of the Council), an SPC “shall be granted if, […] (a) the product is protected by a basic patent in force“.

How to determine whether a product can be considered as being “protected” by a basic patent has been the subject of intense litigation and numerous rulings from the CJEU, which are mentioned in the TGI’s judgment. Again, readers of this blog can refer to the Truvada post, which contains a short summary of the most important CJEU case law prepared by Lionel Vial.

CJEU case law on the interpretation of the SPC regulation: each ruling always leads to more referrals.

In the present case, none of the claims of EP’455 explicitly recites the combination of the three active compounds of the combination. Instead:

  • efavirenz is covered by a generic formula in claims 1 and 5 and is singled out in claims 2 and 12 (as well as in claims 8 and 9 but in combination with other drugs different from tenofovir and emtricitabine);
  • tenofovir and emtricitabine are not cited in the patent;
  • claims 7 and 16 relate to the combination of a generic formula (covering efavirenz), or of efavirenz specifically, together with a nucleoside analog;
  • tenofovir and emtricitabine belong to this category of nucleoside analogs.

According to the court, this is insufficient to consider that the combination of the three active compounds is protected by the EP’455 patent pursuant to article 3(a).

Says the court:

It turns out that the description never explicitly cites either tenofovir or emtricitabine which are not identified in the EP’455 patent, be it individually or collectively in a composition. And in addition the specific combination claimed as an active product “efavirenz + emtricitabine + tenofovir” is not implicitly but necessarily and specifically taught in the description, and no indication makes it possible for the skilled person to select emtricitabine and tenofovir as nucleoside analogs. 

In fact, if I understand correctly, emtricitabine and tenofovir were not even identified and known yet as anti-HIV drugs at the filing date of the EP’455 patent.

Furthermore, the court refused to consider the claims relied upon by MSD (reciting nucleoside analogs) as “functional claims” because “they do not describe the structure which should be present nor the function that the second and third products should have in this structure“.

For the sake of completeness, the court stated that even if the claims were considered as functional, the four-step test established by the Dutch patent office would then not be satisfied. Again, this same test was discussed in the previous Truvada post, so I will not describe it again here.

As a consequence, the SPC was found to be invalid under article 3(a).

By way of overkilling, the court added that the SPC was also invalid in view of article 3(c) of the SPC regulation, per which an SPC “shall be granted if, […] (c) the product has not already been the subject of a certificate“.

In this case, another SPC had been granted based on the same EP’455 patent, namely the efavirenz SPC. MDS relied on the Georgetown CJEU decision (C 484/12). According to this decision, article 3(c) does not preclude the grant of one SPC for a combination of active ingredients, and another SPC for a single active ingredient, based on the same patent.

Nevertheless, according to the TGI, Georgetown is only applicable if the mono and combo products are separate inventions.

In one brief paragraph, the court then held that:

the combination of efavirenz with emtricitabine and tenofovir does not represent a separate invention which may give the right to a second SPC. For this second reason, SPC [FR’021] is invalid under article 3(c) of the regulation. 

Those readers in favor of pan-European consistency (which probably means most readers of this blog) will be happy to know that the TGI’s decision mirrors a similar ruling in the UK handed down on March 21, 2017, per which the corresponding UK SPC was declared invalid by Mr. Justice Arnold.


CASE REFERENCE: Tribunal de grande instance de Paris, 3ème chambre 1ère section, November 30, 2017, Mylan SAS v. Merck Sharp Dohme Corp., RG No. 16/14466.